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2018 Conference Presentations

General

Topic Presenters Session
Taoist Philosophy and Decision-Making
Hong Li
211
Be Influential, Indispensable, and Incredibly Happy at Work: The Power of Branding!
Marie Zimenoff
221
Two-Eyed Seeing as a Framework for Incorporating Indigenous Knowledge into Career Counselling Practice and Career Counsellor Education in Canada and across the Asia Pacific Region
José Domene and Jenny Rowett 224
Credentialing Pathway: NCDA’s Journey to Credentialing  Constance Pritchard
234
Panel: Customizing Career Theories/Practices to Your Culture
Brian Hutchison, Hsiu-Lan (Shelley) Tien and Praveen Parameswar 
241
Talk as the Medium for Developing Social Intelligence in the Workforce
Bonnie Chan and Phyllis Chan 
252
Narrative Career Counselling: Applying Systems Thinking Mary McMahon
284
Aligning the Aspirations and Skills of Qatar’s Youth with the Needs of the Qatari Economy
Abdulla Al Mansoori and Effrosyni Parampota 286
Action: What It Is and Why It Matters in Career Counseling
Richard Young
311
APCDA’s Glossary Project
Danita Redd, Serene Lin-Stephens, Sing Chee Wong, Agnes Banyasz, Carmela Siojo, Vanada Chopra, and Marilyn Maze
324
Supervision of Career Counsellors and Career Development Practitioners: An Emerging Specialization
Roberta Neault and Jenny Rowett
334
Connecting University Students to Society: Building A Positive Social Impact
Yuwei Gu
335
A Typology of Career Practitioner Orientation – A Singaporean Perspective.
Timothy Hsi
336
Panel: Skills for the Gig Economy
Han Kok Kwang, Roberta Neault and Brian Hutchison
341
Finding the Missing Pieces – Experience, Reflection & Co-creation of Service Model for Buddies in Career Transition in Hong Kong & in Asia Pacific Region
Anthony Cheng
354
Indigenous Counseling and Psychotherapy in China: A Scoping Study
Yuan Ying Jin
362
The Knowdell Career Transition Model: Moving from Counseling to Coaching
Richard Knowdell and Roberta Floyd
381
Cracking the “Creative” Case
Lindsay Doung and Reem Buhazza
384
The Science of Happiness at Work
Dianne Scott
385
Career Services Provider Credentialing in Japan and Expected Competencies for those with Career Consultant License Midori Nonogaki and Shujiro Mizuno
424
Narrative Career Counselling: Constructing a Career Future in Context
Hazel Reid
426
Hope-Centered, Actively Engaged Career Development
Norman Amundson
431
Self-Compassion and Psychological Well-Being among Counselors
Voon Siok Ping and Poh Li Lau
417

School

Topic Presenters Session
Nurturing Career Adaptability and Talent Development: The Life Skills Development Model 
Mantak Yuen
231
Development of Career Counseling in Secondary Education in the People’s Republic of China Lorri Capizzi, Xiaolu Hu, Chunmei Jin, Meng Wang and Li Zhong
235
Parents’ Role and Needs in Supporting Career Development of Junior Middle School Students with Special Educational Needs in Macao
Claire Ouyang
236
Examining Family Influence on Career Decision Making Process: Assessment and Implications for Chinese Youth
Mei Tang and Xueying Gu
237
Lifology.com: A Growth Ecosystem for Youth Powered with Technology and Human Factors
Praveen Parameswar
254
A Typical School Day for High School Students in the Honors Program at Ateneo de Davao High School: A Time Allocation Study
Aireen Arabis
264
An Integrative Review of the Teacher Support for Career Development
Jiahong Zhang, Gaowei Chen, and Mantak Yuen
326
Five Core Qualities of Career Guidance and Counseling Professionals in High Schools in China
Ya Wen, Xueying Gu and Xueping Shen
328
Childhood Career Exploration: Planting and Nurturing the Seeds of Career Development
Roberta Neault
355
Reach Higher and Linked Learning: The Implications of These Initiatives on Current School Counseling Practices
Loretta Whitson, Marilyn Harryman and Caroline J. Lopez
414
Assessing the Career Development Needs of Senior High School Students: A Proposal for Career Interventions, Programs, and Assessment
Leonila Urrea
416

College

Topic Presenters Session
“My life is now over the ocean, my folks are now over the sea “– A Practitioner’s View of International Students’ Career Choices
Agnes Banyasz
222
Multiple Predictors of Career Adaptability Among Private University Students in Hong Kong
Tom Fong, Qiuping Jin, Sze Hang Tong, and Raysen Cheung
223
How Effective are Traditional Western Approaches to Career Counseling in Asian Cultural Contexts?
David Lucero 232
Gamifying and Digitalizing a Co-curricular Employability Skills Program
Eric Asato
227
Career Adaptability Mediates Gender Stereotyping and Sense of Belonging in Chinese STEM Undergraduates
Jiajia Zhu and Zhijin Hou
261
Using a Flipped-classroom Teaching Model to Promote College Students’ Engagement in Elected Career Development Courses
Ling-Yan Yang
262
Vocational Imagination of Pre-service Teachers in Taiwan
Shu-Chen Wu
263
College Students’ Perception of Career Services Provided at the University: Does that Match with Faculty/Staff’s Action?
Hsiu-Lan Tien
282
Vocational Identity Statuses of University Students in the Chinese Context: Parental Career Behavior and Traditional Cultural Belief Profiles
Qiuping Jin and Raysen Cheung
283
Rebranding Your Job Skills: How to Rebrand and Market Your Relevant Skills to Get the Job You Want!
MaryAnn Verdolino-VanAalten
285
A Five-Day Career Leadership Camp for College Students and Its Empirical Evidence for Seven Years
Sungsik Ahn, Inki Kim, Minhee Yang and Insang Jung
322
Research on the Connection Mode of University and High School Career Education Under the Background of the New College Entrance Examination Reform in China
Xue-ping Shen, Ai-hua Xu and Ya Wen
325
Are STEM Students Ready for Their 21st Century Employers? An Australian Study
Serene Lin-Stephens
332
The Career Fitness Program: Exercising Your Options to Meet the Needs of Society and Family
Lisa Raufman
333
Imparting Emotional Intelligence Skills for Career Development through a Psychological Intervention
Rashmi Saroha
337
Mobility of Chinese students in France: Challenges and Issues for career development
Yuanfei Huang, Laurent Sovet, and Anne-Marie Costalat-Founeau
351
Creating a Service-Minded Careers Culture at Universities
Dreama Johnson
352
An Experiment with the “Whole-Person Development” Approach to Traditional Career Service in a Private Post-secondary College
Sze Wan Tsang, Joseph Chan Kai Nin and Penny Tse Siu Yin
353
Career selection in Indian college Youth: Role of Mass-Media
Sunil Gupta
357
Career and Advising Center (CAC) at Nazarbayev University
Yevgeniya Kim
363
Women’s Empowerment Club in Vietnam
Felicity Brown and Ngoc Anh Nguyen
382
Analyzing the Factor Structure of The Career Aspiration Scale-Revised Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis
Deepesh Rathore
383
Using Mentorship to Elevate Self-Direction among Students for Job Hunting
Maki Arame and Rei Shimmen Miura
386
Understanding the Process of Savoring: A Weekly Diary Study
Hsiao-Feng Cheng
387
Using a Career Development Intervention to Support Women in STEM Majors
Yangyang Liu
412
Career Transitioning: How Career Counselors Can Facilitate Success for Students Transitioning from Educational Institutions to the Workforce
Julie Rosengren
413
Beyond Narrative Identity: A Counselling Psychology Graduate Student’s Expansion of Individuality to Universality
Tsz Chui Lai
421
Self-concept, Attitudes towards Career Counseling and Work Readiness among Vocational Students in Malaysia
Poh Li Lau
422
Career Self-efficacy’s Role on Career Learning Experiences and Outcomes of Graduating College Students 
Lena Catalan
423

Adults

Topic Presenters Session
What is the “Integration of Mental Health Care and Career Support” Required of Business Companies?
Momoko Asaka
226
Opportunity or Challenge: Growing and thriving in a changing world?
Allan Gatenby
251
Lifelong Learning Opportunities and their Influence on the Development of Recent Graduates' Career Capital
Yvonne Kong-Ho
253
Career Planning, Development, Job Placement, or Coaching with Adults
Alice Ku
256
Flourishing in the Workplace? A Study on Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover Intention of Career Services Professionals in Sino-Foreign Cooperative Universities
Hao Guo, Jenna Jiang, and Ji Tang
257
Building the Career and Talent Development Professions in China and the Philippines
Brian Schwartz
321
A Pilot Career Training Study with Information Technology Intern Students at San Jose State University (SJSU)
Richard Knowdell
323
Key Strategies & Career Counseling to Develop Internal Talents in Organization
Anne Chen
331
Working during Retirement: New Directions in Career Development
Rashmi Saroha
356
Towards the Development of Parents’ Coaching Skills on their Children’s Career Choices
Sonia Mendoza
361
Millions of Millennials: The Disconnect in Today’s Workforce, and What We Can Do About It
Hao Guo, Jeremy Hissong, and Season Yao
411

Labor Market

Topic Presenters Session
Highlights from ICCDPP’s 2017 International Symposium: A Global Perspective and Discussion
Hsiu-Lan Tien, Raza Abbas, Roberta Neault, Sungsik Ahn and Sing Chee Wong
225
Development Sector Career Program for Millennials
Raza Abbas
287
Using Big Data and AI to Power a Nation’s Transformation
Gary Gan and Hector Lin
255

Wednesday, May 16

211

Taoist Philosophy and Decision Making by Dr. Li

Using scientific research methods to study a few basic tenets of Taoist philosophy has produced some fascinating results.  Science assumes that it is possible to identify the “best” outcome.  This assumption leads to the concept of maximization, in which a person strives constantly to maximize the likelihood of achieving the best outcome.  Yet research shows that people who strive for the best never experience satisfaction.  This is the Maximization Paradox.  Taoist philosophy tells us that an objective best cannot exist. Rather, the Yin and Yang, of which everything is constituted, must be balanced.  Everything is dialectical and changeable according to Taoist philosophy.  Scientific experiments will be described which prove that an objective best cannot exist and demonstrate the value of Taoist philosophy.

Click here to download the handouts.


Professor Hong Li is a social scientist who focuses on decision-making and emotions.  She has read Taoist philosophy for the past 20 years and struggled to relate it to her scientific training. Empirical research assumes that it is objectively possible to identify a best decision.  In contrast, Taoist philosophy views the world as an ever-changing dialectic where both sides are equally valuable.  According to Taoist philosophy, an objective best cannot exist.  To scientifically find out which position better describes reality, Dr. Li has conducted a number of studies using decision-makers who believe in an objective best and try to maximize their decisions.  She has learned that they inevitably become disappointed and discouraged. This is called the maximization paradox.  By using the scientific method to compare some widely held assumptions to tenets of Taoist philosophy, Dr. Li has found some fascinating answers which have direct application to career decision-making and counseling.


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221

Be Influential, Indispensable, and Incredibly Happy at Work: The Power of Branding! by Marie Zimenoff

Hard work and good communication skills (emotional intelligence) open doors for our careers. How do we help individuals open the doors that best align with their skills, get feedback on their strengths, and give feedback to those around them? The answer might surprise you: personal branding! In this interactive presentation, Master Brand Strategist Marie Zimenoff will dispel common myths around personal branding and teach you how you can use this foundational career tool to do an honest assessment of strengths. You’ll walk away with tools to apply personal branding with humility (without bragging), improving self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and leadership competence!


As CEO of Career Thought Leaders Consortium, Marie Zimenoff merges vision and best practice training to elevate the careers industry worldwide. She trains career professionals around the globe in resume writing, career coaching, and business development and is a frequent presenter at national conferences, including NCDA. Marie holds her MEd in Counseling and Career Development from Colorado State University and numerous resume writing, coaching, and branding certifications. She served as President of the Colorado Career Development Association (2010–2011) and is among a select group of graduates from the National Career Development Association Leadership Academy.



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222

My life is now over the ocean, my folks are now over the sea – A Practitioner’sView of International Students’ Career Choices by Agnes Banyasz

International students and graduates occupy an important role in Australian universities’ student body as well as amongst graduate job seekers. Through a 360 degree perspective of nearly 30 years’ professional practice, and using case studies of broad relevance well beyond Australia, participants in this presentation will investigate the milestones of the career/life planning and decision making students go through before and after graduation, in pursuit of their and their families’ goals and aspirations, and discuss the responsibilities and skill set requirements of the career advisor in this process.

Click here to download the handouts.


Agnes Banyasz is a career strategist and intercultural communications coach with 30 years’ experience that spans industries and continents. For 10 years she managed the first faculty-based career center at the University of Melbourne that offered customized career services to business students and alumni. She is a CICA accredited Certified Leading Professional, maintains memberships in key professional associations and has participated in conferences all over world. This connectedness to local and international best practice allows her to build strong and rewarding relationships with clients. Outside work, Agnes likes to swim, walk, be with family, watch movies and listen to jazz.


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223

Multiple Predictors of Career Adaptability Among Private University Students in Hong Kong by Tom Fong, Qiuping Jin, Sze Hang Tang, and Raysen Cheung

The presentation focuses on a cross sectional study that examined multiple predictors of career adaptability among 633 final year students from 5 private universities in Hong Kong. Results suggested that beyond the most well-established personality traits, academic achievement, career relational support and career exploration were also significant predictors of career adaptability among university students. Students’ major of study, past internship experience and parental education level, however, did not predict career adaptability. Implications of the finding for theory building and practice will also be discussed.


As Vice-President (Organizational Development) of Hang Seng Management College, Dr. Tom Fong takes charge of overall management and administration, development of student affairs, and campus services strategies.  He drives various internship and co-curricular initiatives to enhance employability for all students.  He works closely with Residential College Masters on residential life education programs to develop traditions and values.  Previously, Dr. Fong held senior positions as Director of Student Affairs (Ag.) in the Chinese University of Hong Kong and as Director of Student Affairs in the Education University of Hong Kong (formerly the Hong Kong Institute of Education).


Qiuping Jin is currently a PhD student in the Department of Applied Social Sciences at City University of Hong Kong. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Peking University in Beijing, China. Her current research focus is on vocational identity development of college students in China. She has also taken part in several research projects of career development and intervention evaluation in university settings. She has presented some of her work in international conferences such as the International Congress of Applied Psychology.


Sze-Hang Tang is a registered Industrial-Organizational Psychologist and currently working as an Instruction Designer for Hang Seng Management College. She obtained her Psychology Degree from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and further pursued her master degrees in both Applied Psychology (The Hong Kong Polytechnic University) and Occupational Psychology (The University of Nottingham). In addition, she is a Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF), a Certified Test User (ability test and personality test), a certified NLP Practitioner and a guest facilitator for various community projects and training events. She is experienced in developing web-based tools which aim at improving mental wellness, work productivity and employability.


Raysen Cheung is Associate Professor in the Department of Counselling and Psychology of Hong Kong Shue Yan University. He obtained his PhD in Vocational Psychology from Loughborough University in England and served as a university counselor specializing in career guidance and counseling in Hong Kong for over 13 years. Currently, he is researching and teaching in areas of career development, employability and professional counselling. He is a Registered Counselling Psychologist and a Registered Industrial-Organizational Psychologist of the Hong Kong Psychological Society, as well as an Associate Fellow of the Hong Kong Professional Counselling Association.

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224

Two-Eyed Seeing as a Framework for Incorporating Indigenous Knowledge into Career Counselling Practice and Career Counsellor Education in Canada and across the Asia Pacific Region by José F. Domene, Jenny Rowett

In this presentation, we will discuss issues related to integrating indigenous knowledge systems into contemporary career counselling practice and training, using the situation in Canada as a case example, using the concept of “Etuaptmumk” (Two-Eyed Seeing). We also provide examples of career interventions that embody the principles of etuaptmumk and propose ways to incorporate indigenous knowledge into career counselor education programs. Finally, in the interactive portion of this presentation, we invite audience members to share experiences and ideas for how to integrate concepts from their own cultural backgrounds into career counseling practice/education in their own countries/regions.

Click here to download the handouts.



José F. Domene, PhD, Lpsych is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in School-to-Work Transition at the University of New Brunswick, where he teaches and supervises students in the Med counseling program. His areas of research interest include (a) relational contexts of career development, (b) emerging adults’ transition into the workforce, and (c) professional issues in counselling in Canada, including career counseling practice and education. He has published over 50 journal articles and book chapters on these topics. For more information, see: http://www.unb.ca/fredericton/education/people/josedomene.html


Jenny Rowett, Med, CCC-S is the President-Elect of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association and a Licensed Counselling Therapist, doctoral student and instructor at the University of New Brunswick. She is a clinical supervisor for students during their practicums, and for counselling professionals in her private practice. Her research interests include the integration of traditional knowledge systems and practices with Western approaches to counseling and counselor education.


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225

Highlights from ICCDPP’s 2017 International Symposium: A Global Perspective and Discussion by Hsiu-Lan Tien, Raza Abbas, Roberta Neault, Sungsik Ahn, Sing Chee Wong

Internationally, career development is at a crossroads, where relevance meets impact. In June 2017, delegates from 20+ countries/regions discussed this theme at the 8th International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy in Seoul, Korea. The symposium offers a unique opportunity to facilitate connections and shared learning amongst career development leaders, researchers, and policy influencers from across the world. All are welcome to join reps from Team APCDA and Team Canada to examine symposium outcomes and action plans – if you personally attended this symposium or previous ones, please feel free to share your perspectives as part of the panel. 


Dr Hsiu-Lan (Shelley) Tien received her Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of Iowa in 1993. She is a professor and Department Chair at the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at the National Taiwan Normal University. She was a Fulbright visiting scholar at the Department of Psychology at the University of Maryland (2005-6; 2011-2012). She has also served as President of Taiwan Career Development and Consultation Association (TCDCA), Taipei Counseling Psychologist Association, and APCDA. Currently she is Director of TCDCA. She earned the 2016 International Practitioner of the Year Award from the National Career Development Association.



Raza Abbas is the Chief Executive Officer of Pathway Global Career Institute and Founder of professionalization of Career Education in Pakistan. He earned the Outstanding Career Practitioner Award from APCDA in May, 2017, was recognized by UNESCO as one of the leading Social Entrepreneurs in Asia in the Philippines in 2017, and was profiled in a global bestselling book, The World Book of Hope. Raza walks his talk: currently serving on the Boards of leading global professional career development associations (ARACD, IAEVG and APCDA), collaborating globally, delivering keynotes, leading ground-breaking research, consulting, executing social reform projects on career development, inspiring countless people.


Dr. Roberta Neault, President of Life Strategies Ltd., is a certified career development practitioner, career counselor, and counselor-educator at several universities. She is an award-winning career development thought leader in Canada and internationally, receiving APCA’s Outstanding Educator of Career Professionals award in 2017 and the Gold Medal and Diamond Pin for International Leadership in Career Development. Roberta was an invited co-author of “Supervision of career counsellors and practitioners” in Clinical supervision of the Canadian counselling and psychotherapy profession (2017) and currently serves as President of the Counsellor Educators chapter of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.


Sing Chee Wong is a Career Consultant and Trainer with many years of experience in career coaching, counselling and training. She is accredited by the National Career Development Association (USA) and Institution for Adult Learning (Singapore) to be a Career Development Facilitator Instructor (CDFI), and Master Trainer for the Advanced Certificate in Career Development Facilitation (ACCDF) respectively. She is President of Singapore’s “People and Career Development Association,” which aims to develop career practitioners and those interested in career development. 


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226

What is the “Integration of Mental Health Care and Career Support” Required of Business Companies? by Momoko Asaka

Employees’ mental health problems have become an important issue for companies. What kind of career stress is there behind mental health disorders? There are two types of careers: work and life. To give examples of stress affecting one’s work, there are such things as “human relationship doesn’t work,” “cannot balance work-and-life well.”  It’s important to implement integrated support from both sides by adding a “career model” to the “medical model” to support a career. Career support also leads to prevention of mental health disorders. In this presentation, I’d like to introduce some examples of career support that prevents mental health disorders.

Click here to download the handouts.


Momoko Asaka, CEO at Veriteworks Inc., and member of the Japan Career Development Association (JCDA), Japanese Psychological Association (JPA), Occupational Safety and Health Legal Services Center (OSHLSC), Career Consulting Conference, Japan Stress Check Association (JSCA), National Anger Management Association (NAMA), Japan Anger Management Association (JAMA), Communication Quotient Association (CQA)


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227

Gamifying and Digitalizing a Co-curricular Employability Skills Program by Eric Asato

Can a co-curricular employability skills program reach more than the institutional average of 10% of the student body? At RMIT University Vietnam, we’re optimistic this will happen in 2018, by digitalizing and gamifying the process, while embedding touch points in the curriculum. This presentation describes how RMIT has integrated their employability skills program with Practera’s digital learning platform to engage students through gamification features to create a digital portfolio of employability skills. Come to this session to learn about the struggles, achievements, concerns, and possibilities to scale up a digitalized co-curricular program.

Click here to download the handouts.


Eric Asato, MBA, teaches employability skills in the Careers & Industry Relations Department at RMIT.  After completing his MBA at Seattle University in 2009, Mr Asato moved to Vietnam and become an English teacher because he is passionate about helping students achieve their goals. After 3 years teaching English, he moved to the Careers & industry Department.

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231

Nurturing Career Adaptability and Talent Development: The Life Skills Development Model by Mantak Yuen

This presentation will discuss in detail the Life Skills Development Model as operating in Hong Kong schools. The issues to be considered include: career adaptability and talent development for all students; strategies for nurturing students’ connectedness to school, family, teachers and peers; helping students find meaning in life; and enhancing life skills self-efficacy. Findings from research around these themes will be shared, together with practical suggestions for career guidance and talent development activities. 


Dr. Mantak Yuen is associate professor and Director of the Centre for Advancement in Inclusive and Special Education, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong. He is a Counseling and Educational Psychologist. He serves as the Director of the Doctor of Education Programme. He coordinates courses in guidance and counseling, gifted education and career development. He has published more than 100 journal papers and book chapters. His current research involves investigating links among students’ life skills and talent development, self-efficacy, connectedness, purpose and meaning in career development, and school-based guidance and counseling programs.


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232

How Effective are Traditional Western Approaches to Career Counseling in Asian Cultural Contexts? by David Lucero

Cohorts of students from Asian societies and cultures are growing on our campuses—whether domestic, immigrant, children of immigrants, or on student visas.  Of course, we treat each individually, but career theories and assessments are based on group commonalities—do they hold across cultures?  Focusing on current Chinese student data (with comparisons to other Asian cultures), we will explore the applicability of the Holland Code, Life Mission, Developmental Approach, etc. in contexts that often emphasize collectivist values, family connection, and prestige orientation-with student video clips and a handout of practical considerations for advisors and counselors.

Click here to download the handouts.



David Lucero, has worked as an academic and career advisor for 3 ½ years, and teaches a Career Exploration class; prior to that he was Director of Student Leadership and Activities at a university in Hawaii.  He has a BA in Communications, a master’s degree in Organizational Behavior from the Marriott School of Management, a TESOL certificate (all from BYU), and is currently pursuing both an Advising Certificate from Kansas State University and a master’s degree in Second Language Teaching from BYU.

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233

Counseling and Career Platform on the Development of Life Skills for the 21st Century Millennial by Lucila Bance

Life skills are extremely important in today’s demanding and challenging world as they are necessary in achieving wellness and the competence needed for life. They include all the essential skills for success in the 21st century, helping individuals achieve a positive and healthy living equipped with career ready competencies.  This presentation focuses on the development and implementation of programs on life skills that connect family, career and society and are based on empirical data. It presents a platform that has gone through strides and achieved significant outcomes for millennial global citizenship.


Dr. Lucila Bance is the Director of the Counseling and Career Center of the University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. A recipient of a grant to develop a model counseling and career center in the Philippines from USAID STRIDE. A recipient of a lifetime achievement award from APCDA in Career Development. At present, she is the Philippine Country Director for APCDA.


234

Credentialing Pathway: NCDA’s Journey to Credentialing by Constance Pritchard

The presenters will describe how a professional organization made the journey to credentialing across a 10+ year period.  The presenters will discuss the startup and implementation process from nuts and bolts to financial commitments for adding credentialing to member services. 

Click here to download the handouts.


Dr. Constance J. Pritchard is well known for her work in leadership, business consulting, and career development in many sectors, including nearly every industry sector. As President of The Pritchard Group, a training and consulting firm she founded in 1993, Dr. Pritchard presents seminars and workshops around the USA on career, life management, and organization development topics.  She has delivered career training and consulting training nationally and internationally. Dr. Pritchard is an NCDA Master Trainer, NCDA Fellow, and the Chair of NCDA’s Credentialing Commission.

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235

Development of Career Counseling in Secondary Education in the People’s Republic of China by Lorri Capizzi, Xiaolu Hu, Chunmei Jin, Meng Wang, Li Zhong

Theories of career counseling and development were introduced to China in the 1990’s.  With rapid modernization and development of higher education in China, the number of opportunities for the country’s youth have increased proportionally.  Providing career counseling services has been recognized as an urgent need for schools.  With the need for these services rapidly increasing, educators are extremely motivated to provide career counseling services in the school system.  A panel of school counselor trainers, Chinese school counselors, and education administrators will highlight their school service practice, curriculum, research and the development of national school counselor and consultant certificate standards in this area.


Dr. Lorri M. Capizzi has been a lecturer in the Department of Counselor Education, San José State University, San José, California for the last 12 years where she teaches both undergraduate courses in personal, academic, and career exploration and graduate level courses in the career counseling process. She has 10 years of supervising school counselors in their internships/field-site practicum and over 15 years of federal grant administration. Dr. Capizzi’s expertise is working with first-generation, low-income students and foster youth in both the K-12 and higher education settings.



Dr. Xiaolu Hu is a professor at the Department of Counselor Education, San José State University, San José, California. She has taught career counseling and supervised student internships at SJSU for 27 years, served as a department chair for over 10 years and directed multiple U.S. federal grants which provided services for over 5,000 students in American secondary schools. She introduced career counseling and career development to China with Dr. John Krumboltz and Dr. Sunny Hanson in the early 1990’s. She has been a consultant for Hong Kong Research Grant Council and many universities in China.


Ms. Chunmei Jin is Assistant Director for the Office of Educational Quality and Evaluation Division, Chinese Society of Education. She is also an Assistant Director of Chinese Educational Counseling Certification Center, Associate Dean of Beijing Research Academy of Public Education Sciences. Ms. Jin works in the fields of educational consultation and evaluation in China. She leads management of school assessment reform and experiments in basic education quality evaluation in China. Ms. Jin plays a key leadership role in the development of professional standards for educational counseling and consultation in elementary and secondary schools which was recently published by the Chinese Society of Education.



Ms Youngmei Chen has been an administrator at Beijing Eight-One High School which is a top model school in the city. She was a senior Chemistry teacher with an MBA in educational financial management and administration from Beijing Normal University. She has been a leader of curriculum and instruction reform, developmental career counseling, and student advising program at the school for the last decade.


Mr. Li Zhong is Principal of No.1 High School of Jiangyin, Jiangsu Province. He graduated from Suzhou University, Suzhou City, China. Before he became a principal, he taught high school for 29 years.


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236

Parents’ Role and Needs in Supporting Career Development of Junior Middle School Students with Special Educational Needs in Macao by Claire Ouyang

As the major caregiver of SEN students, the role of parents in supporting career development needs to be fully discussed. In order to provide supports to parents, this research aims in 1) exploring the role of parents when cooperating with educational and helping professionals on their children’s career development issues, and 2) identifying their core challenges and needs as facilitators for their children. Suggestions of parenting education and counseling services for parents will be provided based upon findings of this research.


Dr. Claire Ouyang is the Macao Region Director of APCDA, the Chairperson and founder of the Macao Career Development Association. She received her PhD in counseling psychology at the University of Macao. Her current practicum and research has been focused on career counseling for adolescents and emerging adults and career education in middle school settings.

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237

Examining Family Influence on Career Decision Making Process: Assessment and Implications for Chinese Youth by Mei Tang, Xueying Gu

This presentation will demonstrate the research findings of a study on family influence on Chinese high school students’ career decision making process.  The study explored family influence assessment, and dimensions of influence in relation to gender, parents’ education, and family socioeconomic status.  The results supported the role of family in career planning. The implications of family influence on career decision making process in cross-cultural settings and necessity of integrating family in career planning for high school students will be discussed.


Mei Tang, PhD, LPC, is a Professor in the Counseling Program of the University of Cincinnati. She has been teaching and researching career development and multicultural issues for twenty years.  She is currently the associate editor for Journal of Counseling and Development, and on the editorial board of the Career Development Quarterly.  Her most recent research includes application of “ecological counselor” in career planning, counselor education and international students’ career development. Dr. Tang has collaborated with local schools to provide services to diverse populations in urban settings.



Xueying Gu, PhD, is a Professor at the Institute of Education Research of Nanjing Normal University.  She is in charge of the National Research Center of College Students Career Development.  She has been a visiting scholar to Texas A & M University in the U. S. and The University of Queensland in Australia.  Professor Gu is also the Vice Council of Psychology Association of Jiangsu Province, and Chair of Career Development Commission of Jiangsu Psychology of Association.  Her research areas are career development and planning and vocational assessment. In 2014, her course Self Exploration and Career Development was awarded the national Excellent Course video.



241

Panel:  Customizing Career Theories/Practices to Your Culture by Hsiu-Lan (Shelley) Tien and Praveen Parameswar

At APCDA, we share the most current theories and practices across the Asia Pacific region. But sometimes the practices in one country/region may need to be modified for use in another country/region. Three experienced career professionals will share the process of identifying necessary customization and the types of modifications they needed to make in popular career planning theories or practices to make them work better in their own country/region.

Hsiu-Lan (Shelley) Tien is described above.

Praveen Parameswar is the CEO of Lifology.com, a sophisticated growth ecosystem for children powered with technology and human factors. He is a passionate entrepreneur who cherishes a vision to create a world where every child is led towards a meaningful future. Before venturing into Lifology.com, he was heading Thoughts Academy Plc, a pioneer in Organization Development Interventions across South India.  Mr. Parameswar is a TEDx speaker, educated at the London School of Economics, holds a MBA from the University of Cardiff (UK), and Sir Julian Hodge Prize winner for the best performance in Human Resource Management.


251

Opportunity or Challenge: Growing and Thriving in a Changing World? by Allan Gatenby

An interactive workshop enabling participants to embrace the opportunities inherent in a rapidly changing world; to grow their practice and refine their service offerings.

Click here to download the handouts.


Allan Gatenby is a private practitioner with extensive national and global experience. He began as a school-based career advisor, was then seconded to consultancy roles within NSW Public and Catholic schools. He established a private practice in 2007 with a global focus and network. He is currently Chair of the Institute of Career Certification International, Chair of Wellbeing Australia, Director of Associated Career Professionals International, Principal of OneGroup Leadership, National Secretary of CDAA, Life member of ICDA, and member of APCDA. He is also co-developer of the Accredited Career & Talent Development Training Program currently being implemented in China & the Philippines.


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252

Talk as the Medium for Developing Social Intelligence in the Workforce by Bonnie Chan, Phyllis Chan

This program showcases the successful application of a diagnostic suite, SoundWave, for building the quality and character of social interaction in the workplace and new ways of building coaching skills for engaging employees in a culture of improvement.  The presenters will share the approach of developing verbal strategies in managers and the benefits for the workforce in a context that requires agility in communication as well as in facing challenging outlook of the industry.  Possible applications in Chinese culture will also be explored.

Click here to download the handouts.



Bonnie Chan is an accredited Master Soundwave Practitioner who comes from the international business and executive coaching background.  Specializing in leadership development and cultural transition, Bonnie has seen the value of agility in situational leadership, communication and people engagement.  She is also a Doctoral Candidate in Coaching and Mentoring of Oxford Brookes University


Phyllis Chan, Accredited Soundwave Practitioner who has been working in a major vocational education institute in Hong Kong and leading a team of 30 professionals to provide counselling, life skills training, and career development programs for tertiary students.  She also actively takes part in coaching projects for professionals, parents and youth.


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253

Lifelong Learning Opportunities and their Influence on the Development of Recent Graduates' Career Capital by Yvonne Kong-Ho

Career development has taken on a fresh new perspective in Singapore, with the massive proliferation of career development initiatives afforded by the state since 2013.. This study asked if young graduates know the importance of building their career capital, if they will utilize lifelong learning opportunities to develop their career capital, and to what extent they make use of formal and informal learning opportunities to develop their career capital. It also examined if existing lifelong learning policies and opportunities have influenced recent graduates’ career development journeys and the building of their career capital.


Deeply passionate about the topics of career resilience and career longevity, Yvonne is thankful for the privilege to be able to walk alongside people (from ages 13 to 60) who have faced career conundrums or needed greater clarity in the career-related decisions which they have made. Yvonne has had close to 14 years of experiences in education, people, and career development. It is her greatest hope to see people working towards the building and strengthening of their career capital at every stage of their lives


254

Lifology.com: A Growth Ecosystem for Youth Powered with Technology and Human Factors by Praveen Parameswar

Lifology is about attaining fulfillment in life by keeping professional attributes as the epicenter. To implement this in practice three steps are proposed. Deeper reflection into the self and the world around. Systematic support from a coach/guru in selecting and pursuing a profession Fundamental grounding on the philosophical paradigms of life. The technological system of Lifology.com backed with human intervention supports people, especially children, to achieve fulfillment.

Click here to download the handouts.


Praveen Parameswar is described above.

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255

Using Big Data and AI to Power a Nation’s Transformation by Gary Gan and Hector Lin

Do individuals, organizations, and nations have the skills they need to thrive, or even survive, in the new digital economy? This program showcases the latest technologies that have been used to power universities, trade associations, and key governmental functions in Singapore in the areas of digital career guidance, future skills forecasting and skill-based workforce development. Composed of millions of data points on industries, jobs, and skills, JobKred’s proprietary algorithm harnesses big data to train its AI to decode the inter-dependent relationships among industries, careers, jobs and skills. Applying predictive analytics, it uses a data-driven approach to let the facts provide insights and project the future of jobs, economies and nations. 

Click here to download the handouts.


Gary Gan is an experienced entrepreneur and marketer who has been involved in the startup of several successful companies across a broad spectrum of industries. He co-founded Gaming How, a retail and events company which received the Spirit of Enterprise Award 2013. He was instrumental in the development of a customer management and loyalty solution for retail businesses, TradeHero - a social investment mobile app, and FootballHero. He is currently working on JobKred, a career development platform that uses predictive analytics and data science to help employers hire better, and also helps professionals learn relevant skills and land jobs with personalized learning plans and career recommendations.


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Hector Lin is the CEO and Principal Coach of GioCareers, a social enterprise based in Singapore that advances peer support, community building and holistic career-life guidance. He was trained in Singapore’s WSQ Advanced Certificate in Career Development Facilitation (ACCDF)/Global Career Development Facilitator-Singapore (GCDF-SG) and Singapore’s WSQ Advanced Certificate in Training and Assessment (ACTA). Hector has successfully helped institutions, non-profit organizations and corporations design and implement peer support systems, career guidance workshops and 1-1 personalized mentoring programs. 


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256

Career Planning, Development, or Coaching with Adults by Alice Ku

In Singapore, Education and Career Guidance (ECG) has been given a renewed emphasis, with the Government’s effort this year in promoting lifelong learning amongst its citizenry and deployment of ECG counsellors to Schools and Institutes of Higher Learnings (IHL). The roles of these (ECG) counsellors will be explained as they work in the Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in supporting students in their process of self-discovery, enabling them to navigate their career pathways purposefully. However, within an individual’s exosystem, there are also changes to the way people learn, communicate and gather information for decision making in the digital age. The presenter will share the journey and challenges of an ECG counsellor in fulfilling this mission in the polytechnic.

Click here to download the handouts.

Alice Ku is currently a practicing ECG Counsellor deployed by the Ministry of Education (MOE), Singapore in Republic Polytechnic (RP). She is also one of the pioneer batch of ECG counsellors in MOE’s Guidance Branch fraternity to attain a Specialist Diploma in Career Counselling and an Advanced Certificate in Career Development Facilitation from the Singapore Workforce Skills Qualification in 2015. Prior to this role, Alice held an industry development portfolio with the Office of Industry and Collaboration at Republic Polytechnic looking at partnerships between RP and external organizations with the aim for internships and project opportunities for RP students. Alice possessed a first degree in Business Administration from RMIT University and had worked in both the public and private sector before joining the education scene.


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257

Flourishing in the Workplace? A Study on Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover Intention of Career Services Professionals in Sino-Foreign Cooperative Universities by Hao Guo, Jenna Jiang, and Ji Tang

In the past two decades, the internationalization of the Chinese higher education sector has been an important element of national policy as the country/region seeks to develop world-class research universities. There are nine Sino-Foreign Cooperative Universities that have been established in China. With the development of the experimental education model, Career Centers have been playing a vital role in preparing future leaders who will be equipped with a wide-angle lens and a global understanding. The purpose of this study is to measure and explore factors influencing Career Services Professionals' job satisfaction, organizational commitment and turnover intentions by collecting and analyzing quantitative data and qualitative data in two consecutive phases.


Hao Guo is the Director of Employer Relations of the Career Development Center at NYU Shanghai. She is responsible for providing guidance and support to students regarding their career planning, decision-making, and job search processes. Her primary focus is on employer relations and building long-term collaboration with external partners for programs such as Off-Campus Internship, Industry Mentorship and On-Campus Recruitment. In addition to these responsibilities, she also collaborates closely with the NYU campus in New York City and the NYU Abu Dhabi career development centers. She holds a master’s degree in Comparative Education from East China Normal University.


Jenna Jiang is an Associate at the NYU Shanghai Career Development Center. Jenna is mainly responsible for students’ graduation process and Chinese First Destination report. She not only supports various programs and sessions, but also maintains the university job posting system to connect students with potential opportunities. Additionally, she provides workshops and resume and cover letter coaching to students. Jenna earned two master’s degrees, one in Social and Organizational Psychology from University of Exeter and the other in Industry and Organizational Psychology from East China Normal University.



Ji Tang is the Coordinator of Campus Partnerships of NYU Shanghai Career Development Center. She is responsible for managing career programs, marketing, and employer relations. She works closely with New York and Abu Dhabi career centers to generate strategy to develop updated industry information and job opportunities in China and other regions in the world. Before joining in NYU Shanghai, Ji worked at Duke Kunshan University as Project Analyst and Specialist of Government Relations for 4 years. She was responsible for strategic projects management and government relation affairs. Ji graduated from University of Washington with a master's degree in International Studies.


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261

Career Adaptability Mediates Gender Stereotyping and Sense of Belonging in Chinese STEM Undergraduates by Jiajia Zhu, Zhijin Hou

This study investigated the mediating role of career adaptability from the predicted gender stereotype threat to Chinese college students’ sense of belonging in STEM (N = 786). It was posited that gender stereotyping would have a negative effect on students’ sense of belonging (Spencer, Logel, & Davies, 2016). It was further explored whether personal coping resources would be undermined by the threat of being stereotypically judged by others. and play an intermediate role on the predicted relationship between the gender stereotype threat and a sense of belonging in STEM. Findings supported the mediational assumption of career adaptability.


Dr. Zhijin Hou is a Professor at the Beijing Normal University. She has expertise in career development and counseling psychology. She has over 40 peer reviewed journal publications, 2 series of textbooks, and 3 translated books and presented over 40 conference presentations in these areas. She has been PI on grants funded by the National Social Science Fund of China to support her research.



Jiajia Zhu is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Institute of Clinical and Counseling Psychology, Beijing Normal University. Her research interests include women engineering students' professional identity and persistence, and family's influence on adolescents' career development.


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262

Using a Flipped-classroom Teaching Model to Promote College Students’Engagement in Elected Career Development Courses by Ling-Yan Yang, Lin Liu and Yanxin Zhu

The present study examines the effectiveness of using a flipped-classroom model to promote college students’ engagement in elective career development courses. By using the flipped-classroom model, the class meeting time was no longer used for the instructor to share new concepts and methods, but was used to facilitate student participation in purposefully designed activities and to discuss individual student’s understanding and experiences with these new concepts and methods. Results showed that using a flipped-classroom model positively increased the students’ learning engagement in course assignments, as well as the students’ positive class experience and learning outcomes.

Click here to download the handouts.

Dr. Ling-Yan Yang received her Ph. D. in school psychology from the University of Iowa in 2013. She completed her internship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe Meyer Institute and then continued her training as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Behavioral Psychology. Dr. Yang received her professional license for school psychologist in the state of Iowa in 2013, and she received her provisional license to practice psychology in the state of Nebraska in February of 2014. Dr. Yang joined the faculty in Department of Sociology and Social Work at Xiamen University in 2015.



Lin Liu is currently a master student in the school of public affairs, Xiamen University. She is majored in social work. Her research interest is related to career development and intervention for college students and students in secondary vocational schools



Yanxin Zhu is currently a master student of Social Work in the School of Public Affairs, Xiamen University. Her current research concentrates on the career development intervention for students in secondary vocational school.



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263

Vocational Imagination of Pre-Service Teachers in Taiwan by Shu-Chen Wu

This study aims to explore vocational imagination of pre-service teachers in Taiwan. 60 pre-service teachers’ vocational imagination stories were analyzed using the Thematic analysis method. The findings provide a description of the pre-service teacher's career preparation, ideal job type, and the type of executives and colleagues they would least like to encounter. 

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Shu-Chen Wu is an associate professor for National Taiwan Normal University. She is also a licensed counseling psychologist in Taiwan (ROC). She has been working in the career field over 15 years, including doing pre-service teacher’s career education and doing in-service teacher career literacy training.


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264

A Typical School Day for High School Students in the Honors Program at Ateneo de Davao High School: A Time Allocation Study by Aireen Arabis

This study aimed to ascertain the profile of honor students in Ateneo de Davao Junior High School. With the use of mixed-method of research, it employed a Self-Report Time Use Survey, Focus Group Discussion (FGD), In-depth Interview (IDI) and observation checklist to gather data from 40 respondents. The profile included socio-demographic characteristics, social involvement; access to telecommunications and recreational gadgets; leisure and views on the Honors Class Formation Program. The time use of the honor students reveal overlapping activities. Most of the respondents multi-task and are sleep-deprived.  There is an indication that they spend much of their time on projects, performance tasks and club/organization involvement.


Aireen Arabis is a Guidance Counselor at Ateneo de Davao University Junior High School Unit.  She works as a Campus Minister, CLE Teacher, PEHM Teacher, NSTP Professor, FYDP Facilitator, and Asst. Professor in San Pedro College & Ateneo de Davao University College Unit. She also works as a Volunteer Seminary Counselor at Divine Word Formation Center, Skyline Road Catalunan Grande, Davao City.


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281

Can Women (and Men) Have it All? Yes, They Can! by Mohini Vidwans

It is said that career progression of women often comes at a price – of marriage or having no/fewer children or not being able to fulfil family responsibilities meaningfully. The notion is that women can’t have it All. Career crafting, a new paradigm of career development guides women (and men) on how to have it All. This is achieved through the career crafting triad composed of cognitive, relational and task crafting. The paradigm presents the interactive relationship between individual’s career crafting, and the external constructs of family, organization and environment, integrating personal and professional spheres leading to career success.


In search of personal and professional development, Mohini Vidwans came across the concept of Job Crafting in 2011. Her personal experience inspired her further to investigate this concept and she arrived in New Zealand in 2012 to do her second PhD at Lincoln University to examine and develop the concept of career crafting. Focusing on gender and career progression, she researched career journeys of 36 accounting professionals in New Zealand. The title of her thesis is “Exploring Career Success with the New Paradigm of Career Crafting.” The qualitative study led to developing a career crafting paradigm confirming the association between crafting skills, external factors and career success. Currently, Mohini is working as a lecturer at Lincoln University teaching undergraduate and post-graduate classes; and continues her work in the field of career development and research utilizing the model of career crafting.

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282

College Students’ Perception of Career Services Provided at the University: Does that Match with Faculty/Staff’s Action? by Hsiu-Lan Tien

The purpose of the study was to analyze the student’s perception of career services provided by the university, especially in the department and university Career Center. We interviewed 13 college students in Taipei. The results indicate: (1) the students always want to get more information to prepare for the future; (2) a platform for career information should be created and friendly; (3) opportunities for nontraditional career track or venture funding for entrepreneurship should be available for excellent/creative students; (4) job fairs and practice opportunities are highly valued. Some opinions from the faculty and staff members were also examined. We will explore the gap. Ways to make university career services more practical and friendly will be discussed.


Dr. Hsiu-Lan Shelley Tien described above.

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283

Vocational Identity Statuses of University Students in the Chinese Context:Parental Career Behavior and Traditional Cultural Belief Profiles by Qiuping Jin, Raysen Cheung

The presentation will focus on a study that evaluated the parental career behavior and cultural beliefs profiles of six Vocational Identity statuses (VI) in the Chinese context with a sample of 739 university students. The results of the study suggested that the six VI statuses are well differentiated in both variables. The contextual and cultural profiles added to the understanding of VI statuses in the Chinese context in addition to their psychosocial profiles founded earlier by the same authors. Theoretical and practice implications of these findings will be discussed in detail.

Qiuping Jin & Raysen Cheung are described above.

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284

Narrative Career Counseling: Applying Systems Thinking by Mary McMahon

Career counseling has embraced holistic narrative ways of working that assist clients to co-construct, deconstruct, construct and reconstruct career stories. Career counsellors using narrative approaches must listen carefully to clients’ stories in order to elicit clues that they can use to stimulate further story telling. Drawing on the metaphor of archaeology, this presentation will consider how to listen for clues and how to use systems thinking and story crafting questions to foster story telling in narrative career counseling. Systems thinking will be explained, examples will be provided, and strategies will be suggested for career counselors.


Dr. Mary McMahon is an Honorary Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at The University of Queensland where she taught career development and narrative career counselling. She is an Executive Member of the Career Industry Council of Australia. She is a developer and co-author of the internationally recognized Systems Theory Framework of Career Development which takes a holistic ‘individual in context’ view of career development. Mary researches and publishes on career development across the lifespan and narrative career counseling.

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285

Rebranding Your Job Skills: How to Rebrand and Market Your Relevant Skills to Get the Job You Want! by MaryAnn Verdolino-VanAalten

The global job market is creating new jobs in new fields at a rapid rate.  Job seekers might feel retraining is necessary to obtain these positions, however, they might already have the required skills for the job they want.  A skills evaluation can provide a new direction through rebranding and marketing transferable skills without pursuing additional training.  The challenge is marketing relevant skills to potential employers and positions rather than just listing all skills.  Participants will learn how to rebrand their skills, strategies to market them, and how different résumé styles might better highlight transferable skills in today’s economy.


MaryAnn Verdolino-VanAalten has over 12 years of counseling experience at Suffolk County Community College (SCCC), the largest community college in SUNY.  She is the only Career Counselor on campus serving a highly diverse population of over 9,000 students.  MaryAnn is also a SCCC Professor teaching college and career planning and skill assessment.  She has earned, with honors, a B.S. in Business Management and Technology with emphasis in marketing and a M.S. in Counseling with emphasis in career planning.  She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Psychology with emphasis in performance psychology.  Additionally, MaryAnn established her own Career Counseling Consulting firm in 2009.


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286

Aligning the Aspirations and Skills of Qatar’s Youth with the Needs of the QatariEconomy by Abdulla Al Mansoori, Effrosyni Parampota

In a bid to fine-tune its career guidance strategy and further contribute to the accomplishment of Qatar’s National Vision 2030, Qatar Career Development Center has conducted a number of research projects over the 2015-2017 period to provide evidence-based data on the topic. This overarching report aims to drive a more coherent approach to career development and career guidance services in Qatar. It highlights priority areas with respect to aligning the aspirations & skills of the youth with the needs of the Qatari economy and includes a set of pertinent and practical recommendations to help overcome the challenges faced.

Click here to download the handouts.


Abdulla Al Mansoori is the Executive Director of Qatar Career Development Center, a member of Qatar Foundation, since 2008 and is a reputed Qatari reference in relation to Career Guidance. Prior to joining QF, he successfully took on the responsibility of creating, leading and managing student and career activities’ related centers within Qatar University, where he left a remarkable and unforgettable trace throughout almost a decade.  Alongside his achievements at QU, Abdulla served as a faculty member at the Institute of Administrative Development in Qatar, teaching management and accounting courses, and lecturing on administration topics.


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Effrosyni Parampota is a Senior Officer at Qatar Career Development Center, Qatar Foundation, that supports Qatari capacity building in alignment with the QNV 2030 and the aims of a knowledge-based economy.  Her work focuses in developing impactful projects, produce literature based on research, and assessment of career exchange services locally and abroad, that enrich and support career guidance/planning practices, literature & policy-making within the State of Qatar.  She is a member of IAEVG, APCDA, NCDA, the Institute of Leadership & Management and served in the technical committees of three national forums.


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287

Development Sector Career Program for Millennials by Raza Abbas

The millennial generation is the generation of children born between 1982 and 2002.  This generation will replace the Baby-boomers as they retire. Millennials’ interest in far-reaching social issues – the greater good – is driving their cause engagement today. As per various research studies across the globe, millennials want to start a career in the development sector but due to lack of career awareness end-up volunteering. Pathway Global Career Institute has developed a development sector career training program for millennials that will transform their passion for working in the development sector, such as for Asian Development Bank, a reality. 

Raza Abbas is described above.

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Thursday, May 17

311

Action: What It Is and Why It Matters in Career Counseling by Dr. Richard Young

Action is frequently assumed in career counseling. It is often what counselors expect their clients to engage in as an outcome of counseling. But action can be understood more fully and, in doing so, can be the lynchpin of more effective career counseling. First, considering the explanations of the client’s behaviors, goal-directed action allows counselors and clients to base their understanding on the client’s navigation of the future rather than being constrained by the client’s past history or longstanding traits. Secondly, an understanding of goal-directed action is important in career counseling because it is the basis of the client’s construction of the future – initially in terms of short-term projects, and then in terms of long-term careers. Finally, what clients do with others, that is, their joint actions, have an important place in career counseling, because careers rarely occur without the involvement of others.  These themes will be addressed in this presentation with case illustrations and specific ways of using an understanding of goal-directed action in counseling.

Click here to download the handouts.


Richard A. Young is a Professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia. A Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and the American Psychological Association, Professor Young’s interests are in the areas of parent-adolescent interaction, health psychology, and career development. With a number of colleagues, he has extended the application of action theory to topics in career development, health promotion and, particularly, parent-adolescent communication. These applications have included the refinement of a qualitative research method based on action theory as well as its application to cultural studies. With W. A. Borgen, he is the editor of Methodological Studies for the Study of Career (Praeger, 1990), and with A. Collin, Interpreting Career: Hermeneutical Studies of Lives in Context (Praeger, 1992) and The Future of Career (Cambridge University Press, 2000). With L. Valach and M. J. Lynam, he is the author of Action Theory: A primer for Applied Research in the Social Sciences (Praeger, 2002). Professor Young has authored or co-authored over 100 articles and chapters published in scientific and professional journals and books.


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321

Building the Career and Talent Development Professions in China and the Philippines by Brian Schwartz

Having visited China six times before moving there from the USA in July, 2010, I embarked on a profound journey to help catalyze the movement towards a psychodynamically-based career and life design counseling process in Asia. Working simultaneously in China and the Philippines and serving on the Board of Directors of the Institute for Career Certification International, a broad workforce development strategy was developed in parallel to provide depth clinical career counseling training augmented by additional specialties in career coaching, talent development consulting, strategic workforce planning, entrepreneur coaching and education and school-based career guidance and advising to the public and government agencies, an integrated online career self-discovery software application with personal branding addendum and a “small course” broad human and career development menu of courses.

Click here to download the handouts.


Dr. Brian Schwartz is an American psychologist. After 34 years of career management consulting and 30 years of organization development consulting, Dr Schwartz moved from the USA to China. He was on a mission to bring career assessment to young people and to train career and talent development professionals in China as well as other countries/regions within the Asia Pacific area. He developed his online career assessment and personal branding software, CareerDNA, and has developed, with partners, the accredited Career and Talent Development Professionals program, with six specialty training programs built atop a six-day intensive foundational workshop.

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322

A Five-Day Career Leadership Camp for College Students by Sungsik Ahn, Inki Kim, Minhee Yang and Insang Jung

Developing, implementing, and evaluating a new intervention is a critical job for career practitioners. In this presentation, a five-day career development intervention, called Career Leadership Camp, will be presented from its development based on career development theories and models, to effective implementation, evaluation and modification for seven years with empirical evidence. Participants will learn about the development process of a new group intervention based on career development theories and consistent modification for effectiveness based on empirical data collected over seven years.


Sungsik Ahn is a Ph.D. candidate in the Counseling Program of Korea University. He completed his master’s degree in Career Counseling. He is a Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF) and Career Development Facilitator Instructor (CDFI). He has been working for a university career center for twelve years and he received the Minister’s Award for his excellence of services. He has co-authored articles published in the Career Development Quarterly and the Journal of Employment Counseling. He is also South Korea Country Director of APCDA, and a graduate of the NCDA Leadership Academy.


Inki Kim is an Assistant Manager at the Career Development Center of Korea University (KUCDC) and Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). He is an experienced administrative staff with more than ten years working across various administration offices, such as the Office of the President, Office of General Affairs, and Office of Public Relations. He is currently in charge of all administrative works in KUCDC from managing employer relations and campus recruiting to arranging and operating career programs related to job seeking skills. He is especially interested in effective communication and teamwork.


Minhee Yang is a CEO of Play Academy Corporation and a Career Development Facilitator (CDF). She majored in management for her bachelor’s degree and has been working as a career development educator and counselor for more than ten years. She has designed an online career education platform and published several career related books for university students



Insang Jung has worked at university career centers for eight years and is currently a senior administrative officer at the Career Development Center of Korea University Sejong Campus. He recently finished his master’s degree program of Career and Vocational Counseling at the Korea University of Technology and Education. He received the Korean Education Development Institute(KEDI) Director's Award for his excellence of services and he is interested in the effectiveness of career development education.

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323

A Pilot Career Training Study with Information Technology Intern Students at San Jose State University (SJSU) by Dick Knowdell, Sharon Qi, and Anita Manuel

The Knowdell career transition model (assessment, exploration, focus and implementation) was discussed in depth as part of the career coaching process with 10 to 16 information technology intern students at Altamont Development Center at San Jose State University in San Jose, California USA.  The training was conducted in the group format through a series of one-hour brown bag (lunch & learn) sessions.  In the discussions, some of the software engineering skills were also incorporated into the career coaching process.  The coaching effectiveness was surveyed as pre-coaching and post-coaching difference comparison.  The lessons learned are explored in this workshop.


Dick Knowdell is the author of six books on career development and the developer of four career assessment instruments that have been translated into nine languages. He has trained over 7,000 Job & Career Transition Coaches in North America, Asia, Africa, Europe, Australia and South America. He is a National Certified Career Counselor and a Fellow of the National Career Development Association.


Dr. Sharon Qi is both faculty teaching at the College of Business of SJSU and the program manager of the Altamont Development Center, Information Technologies, SJSU.  She holds a Ph.D. degree in education and had rich industry experiences before she joined SJSU.  Now she is working on her second master’s degree in Counselor Education and plans to devote her time to career coaching as the IT Program Manager in the IT system of SJSU.



Anita Manuel is a career educator and administrator with 16 years of higher education experience serving students in the heart of Silicon Valley. She received her M.A. in Counseling from Santa Clara University with an emphasis in Career Development and has developed expertise in counseling diverse student populations through her work at San Jose State University.  Anita is dedicated to helping clients develop innovative strategies that support the creation of meaningful careers.


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324

APCDA’s Glossary Project by Danita Redd, Serene Lin-Stephens, Sing Chee Wong, Agnes Banyasz, Carmela Siojo, Vanada Chopra, and Marilyn Maze

APCDA has been working on a glossary of career planning & development terminology so that we, in the Asia Pacific region, can speak the same language related to career planning & development.  The Glossary Project Workgroup includes APCDA members in several English-speaking countries/regions.  This Workgroup has developed an English version of the glossary.  Participants will be asked to review and comment on this glossary.  We also seek volunteers to translate the glossary to other languages used in member countries.  Please attend to learn about this important project and how you can participate.

Click here to download the handouts.

Glossary of Terms

Danita Redd, M.A., has been counseling and career development faculty at Moorpark College, California, USA, for 23 years. She was awarded the 2016-2017 Moorpark College Distinguished Faculty Chair and was recognized as the 2014 -2015 Academic Senate's Outstanding Faculty of the Year. She is a published writer; a graduate of the Foundation of Human Enrichment for providing therapeutic assistance to people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; and is an international volunteer serving in Egypt, Peru, and Mexico.


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Serene Lin-Stephens is a careers researcher and consultant for over 20 university courses across disciplines. Her postgraduate qualifications span across Higher Education E-learning and Career Development. She is intrigued by ways to embed career development in higher education, including developing appropriate resources and technologies to support it. Her days are filled furthering her research interests through working closely with course conveners and industry stakeholders in a collaborative effort to enhance student outcomes and meet workforce needs.



Agnes Banyasz, Vandana Chopra, and Sing Chee Wong are described above.


Carla S. Siojo has been the Director of the Office of Placement and Career Services at the Ateneo de Manila University for the past 6 years. She finished a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry: Family Ministry and Counseling both at the Ateneo de Manila University. She served as the Philippine Country Director for APCDA and is now the President-Elect of APCDA. She is involved with other professional organizations such the National Career Development Association (NCDA), Association of Placement Practitioners of Colleges and Universities (APPCU) in the Philippines, and the Career Development Association of the Philippines (CDAP).

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Marilyn Maze, PhD, is the Executive Director of APCDA and a Principal of PsyCoun Consultants. She has organized the annual APCDA Conference since its inception, conducted numerous research projects on hot labor market and career counseling issues, and presented at international conferences. Marilyn received the President’s Award from NCDA in 2016, the NCDA Credentialing Commission Service Award in 2016, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Maryland Career Development Association in 2010. Dr. Maze formerly developed the ACT Profile (previously called DISCOVER).

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325

Research on the Connection Mode of University and High School Career Education Under the Background of the New College Entrance Examination Reform in China by Xue-ping Shen, Ai-hua Xu, Ya Wen

China is currently carrying out a new round of college entrance examination reforms. In the choice of university schools and majors, more emphasis is placed on students' choice of future majors and careers. To better understand the current connection between high school and university career education, this research uses the method of questionnaire survey, semi-structured interviews, and field research. It further puts forward the countermeasures from the perspective of university: strengthen the connection with high school career education, establish vocational guidance support systems, and strengthen university-enterprise, study-career links.


Click here to download the handouts.

Xueping Shen is an associate professor and the director of the Career Development Education and Research Center of Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  She is also the secretary-general of the Career Education Committee of Jiangsu Association of Social Psychology.  Her research areas are career development and career education. In past years, her papers about career decision-making difficulty, calling, job research clarity and career courses were published in many scholar journals.


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Ai-hua Xu, is the lecturer/director of Employment Guidance and Service Center of Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His research is in career education and employment guidance.



Ya Wen is a doctoral candidate of Nanjing Normal University. Her research areas are career development and career education. At present, her research interests mainly focus on career guidance and counseling, career assessment and other fields.


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326

An Integrative Review of Teacher Support for Career Development by Jiahong Zhang,  Gaowei Chen, and Mantak Yuen

This review provides an integrative summary of the current and emerging trends in teacher support scholarship and practice in career development by summarizing the key features of 18 empirical studies on teacher support in the career development field. This integrative review provides a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the characteristics of research on teacher support, as well as its influence on student career development. This review will be beneficial to researchers, teachers and policy-makers seeking to optimize support systems for students’ career development.

Click here to download the handouts.


Jiahong Zhang is a PhD candidate in Career Development and Counselling at the Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include career-related teacher support, career-related parental support, vocational identity and career adaptability.



Gaowei Chen is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. He received his PhD in Educational Psychology from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests include classroom discourse, mathematics education, and career development.



Mantak Yuen is described above.

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327

Analyzing the Factor Structure of the Career Aspiration Scale-Revised Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis by Deepesh Rathore

In this study The Career Aspiration Scale- Revised (CAS-R; Gregor & O’Brien, 2016) was used on a sample of Indian undergraduate college students (N=316), to analyze the factor structure of the CAS-R using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). This study also discussed the possibility of gender differences with respect to the career aspirations of undergraduate students.


Deepesh Rathore is currently pursuing his PhD from Department of Psychology, University of Delhi in the area of Emotional Intelligence in which he is constructing a situational judgement test to be used in work settings. In addition, he is teaching at Daulat Ram College, University of Delhi. He has also been working as a research associate on the SWAYAM MOOCS project of the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD)Government of India for the past three years


328

Five Core Qualities of Career Guidance and Counseling Professionals in High Schools in China by Ya Wen, Xueying Gu, Xueping Shen

In the context of the reform of the college entrance examination in China, career guidance and counseling professionals in high school need to have the following core qualities: career education, career information assessment, career activity, career counseling, social system intervention.


Ya Wen, Xueying Gu, and Xueping Shen are described above.

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331

Key Strategies & Career Counseling to Develop Internal Talents in Organization by Anne Chen

It is critical for an organization to have “Internal Development” of the talents needed to face competitive and changing environments. The talent, the key position for which the talent is being prepared, and the career counselors/consultants form a triad. As the third party, career counselors or career consultants play an important role in helping the talents to reflect and engage in an Individual Career Development Plan (ICDP). How do career counselors/consultants work closely with HR and executives to sustain and empower the talents? What are the possible resources that will be needed to carry out the ICDP and meet the organization’s developmental needs?


Prior to becoming the Senior Consultant of Aspire Academy, Anne Rouh-Ling Chen was an executive for international IT and logistics companies. She usually worked closely with the CEO in designing and executing Talent Career Development, Strategic Human Resource Management, Cross-Cultural Team Building, and Culture & Core Competency and Leadership Development Programs. She is also an Executive Coach for global managers. Ms. Chen is the pioneer who established the Career Development Center at Soochow University in Taiwan. She is an active member of APCDA, and Board Member of TCDCA (Taiwan Career Development and Consulting Association), and Supervisor of CHRMA (Chinese Human Resource Management Association in Taiwan).


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332

Are STEM Students Ready for Their 21st Century Employers? An Australian Study by Serene Lin-Stephens

STEM skills are predicted to underpin most emerging occupations in the future workforce and society. However, are STEM students ready for their 21st century employers? Applying the Career Information Literacy Learning Framework, a recent quantitative study conducted in a STEM faculty in an Australian university revealed a significant gap between final year STEM students (n=517, N=1176) and STEM employers (n=62, N=80) in their focuses on student career/employability development. STEM student cohorts predominately focus on discipline-based learning. In contrast, employers desire transformative qualities in STEM students. The findings necessitate rethinking of STEM professional preparation for the future workforce and society.

Click here to download the handouts.


Serene Lin-Stephens is described above.


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333

The Career Fitness Program: Exercising Your Options to Meet the Needs of Society and Family by Lisa Raufman

Learn about how a comprehensive semester-long culturally aware career class is taught providing students with the insights and time to develop skills that will help them create their own futures. The Career Fitness Program is a textbook that prepares Career Counselors and professors to help college age students to discover their talents and skills in order to become the best candidates for the jobs and careers that are yet to be created.  We know that 60% of careers that will be available in 2025 are yet to be “designed and created.”  Current college students will be the designers of these jobs.


Dr. Lisa Raufman is co-author of The Career Fitness Program, Exercising Your Options ,11th ed. (Pearson Education Publisher), a popular career book used in colleges and universities since 1989 and now in its 11th edition. With over 30 years of counseling experience, she has been Faculty Development Coordinator and Dean of Counseling at El Camino College as well as an instructor/counselor and a coordinator of Career Centers at two different colleges (El Camino College and Moorpark College). A popular presenter on career development since the 1980s, she is past president of the California Career Development Association and the Los Padres American Society for Training and Development (ATD) and Membership Chair, APCDA.

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334

Supervision of Career Counsellors and Career Development Practitioners: An Emerging Specialization by Roberta Neault, Jenny Rowett

Canadian Career Development Practitioners (CDPs) and career counsellors work with diverse, complex clients within an equally complex, constantly-changing employment landscape. This context paired with an increased demand for program accountability, highlights the importance for CDPs’ and career counsellors’ increased access to competent supervision to develop relevant competencies. Presenters will examine the current context for clinical supervision in Canada and internationally, explore supervision models and frameworks, and discuss ethical considerations for supervision. Learn how supervision can address competency gaps and improve client service and program outcomes for career counsellors and CDPs.

Click here to download the handouts.


Dr. Roberta Neault and Jenny Rowett are described above.


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335

Connecting University Students to Society: Building a Positive Social Impact by Yuwei Gu, Hiba Dabis

This session will help career practitioners gain new insights and ideas to support university students, or indeed any type of client, to build a career that makes a positive social impact. The Career Development Center at NYU Shanghai will outline the importance of helping students explore career paths in the third sector, and guide the audience to identify challenges and best practices in helping students to navigate careers in this field. They will share some of their own unique practices in working with students, including case studies of student success stories and event programming.

Click here to download the handouts.


Hiba Dabis is a Senior Manager at the NYU Shanghai Career Development Center. She oversees all aspects of students’ career development, including career coaching and skill building workshops. Hiba is passionate about empowering students to learn to manage their careers by making well researched and educated decisions. Prior to joining NYU Shanghai, Hiba worked as a career consultant at the London School of Economics & Political Science, and before that she worked in banking and finance. She completed a master’s degree in Career Coaching with the psychology department at the University of East London, and is also a New York University alum, holding both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Economics.



Yuwei Gu is a Senior Associate at the NYU Shanghai Career Development Center. She provides career advising and support including career exploration, decision making and job search for undergraduate students. She oversees the NYU Executive Alumni Mentor Program, manages the Summer Service Grant, and offers support for NYU Shanghai student workers in terms of pre-professional skills training. In addition, she supports career skill-building workshops, panels and student career conferences. Yuwei earned her master’s degree in Applied Linguistics from East China Normal University. She is passionate about higher education and loves supporting students in making the most of their college experience.


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336

A Typology of Career Practitioner Orientation – A Singaporean Perspective by Timothy Hsi

This paper seeks to explore the range of different career models and approaches adopted by career practitioners across the different organizations providing career services in Singapore. Some career practitioners are encouraged to engage in extensive career exploration with their clients whilst others are expected to provide highly targeted career advice or recommendations to their clients within the shortest amount of time. This study will shed interesting insights into the typologies adopted by career practitioners in response to organizational mandates & demands.


Timothy Hsi is trained as a psychotherapist and has been in practice for 20 years.  Additionally, he has over 15 years of experience as a lecturer & trainer in the field of Counseling and Career Development. Timothy is the current Master Trainer of the Singapore Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF) program as well as the Asian Master Instructor for Knowdell’s Job and Career Transition Coach certification workshops. He also teaches counseling courses at the Australian College for Applied Psychology and James Cook University.


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337

Imparting Emotional Intelligence Skills for Career Development through a Psychological Intervention by Rashmi Saroha

The discipline of Psychology has made major contributions to the field of career development through psychological interventions and trainings for imparting desirable skills to the workforce. Emotional intelligence skills have been found to be extremely important in almost every career. The present study attempts to impart EI skills to the current students of University of Delhi with the help of a psychological intervention. The sample for the study was 30 undergraduate students with age ranging from 18 to 21 years. Procedural descriptions of interventions and results will be discussed.


Dr. Rashmi Saroha holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Delhi. She teaches Psychology at Daulat Ram College (University of Delhi) and has a teaching experience of more than two and a half years. She is the recipient of Junior Research Fellowship awarded by UGC and a Young Achiever Award for contributions in the field of education. She is actively involved in many government and private initiatives in the field of e-learning, MOOCs, Career counselling, etc. She has been the resource person for workshops on Time Management, Assertiveness, etc. and guided research projects of undergraduate students.


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341

Panel:  Skills for the Gig Economy by Han Kok Kwang and Roberta Neault

In the past, it was possible to spend one’s life doing the same type of work.  Today, it is much more common to change projects or employers frequently, gaining skills and knowledge from each experience that is useful for the next project or job.  What kinds of skills or services are needed to cope with constantly refocusing on a new “gig,” both for working smarter and for personal wellbeing.  Two experienced career professionals will explain how they help clients deal with the Gig Economy.


Han Kok Kwang has been in the “globalization game” for more than 29 years as senior manager of a global corporation, international MBA lecturer and entrepreneur. He is the Founder of Personal Mastery Resources, a career development training business in Singapore. Han is one of only two International Master Trainers (outside USA) for the certification for career professionals, Career Development Facilitator (CDF), awarded by the National Career Development Association (USA). He has written 5 career management books (including 2 Bestsellers), won 2 national awards for personal excellence and raised more than $90,000 for the less fortunate with his books. You can connect with Han at Han@personalmaster.com. See his ad on the inside of the back cover.


Roberta Neault is described above.

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351

Mobility of Chinese Students in France: Challenges and Issues for Career Development by Yuanfei Huang, Laurent Sovet, and Anne-Marie Costalat-Founeau

This study examined how Chinese students studying in France perceived, anticipated, and experienced their academic and career development. The data was based on a systematic literature review from studies conducted among this population using diverse sources (e.g. doctoral theses, articles, book chapters). A total of 47 references from 2003 to 2017 were found and analyzed. Similarly, to the international synthesis performed by Zhu (2016), the studies conducted toward Chinese students studying in France used several research methodologies and were focused at different stages of the international mobility (i.e. before, during, and after). Our corpus revealed critical personal, environmental, and ideological barriers related to academic and career development, encountered by Chinese students during and after their international mobility. Implications at both individual and governmental level (i.e. in terms of brain drain and brain gain) were discussed.

Click here to download the handouts.



Yuanfei Huang is a Chinese psychologist who earned her bachelor's and master's degree in Social Psychology and Work and Organizational Psychology at Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier in France. She is preparing to obtain her Ph.D. with research in cross-cultural psychology about the evolution of capacity system and identity dynamic of Chinese students in France during the acculturation process, by using quantitative and qualitative methods. Principally, her work contributes to improve the quality of life and capacity system of international students.



Laurent Sovet is assistant professor of differential psychology at the Université Paris Descartes. He earned a PhD in career counseling psychology at the National Conservatory of Applied Technologies (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers), Paris. His research was initially on cross-cultural differences in career decision-making processes among youths (high school and college students). He has conducted fieldwork in several countries and has been involved in various international collaborative research projects. His current work focuses on examining the relationships between learning experiences and career management skills.



Anne-Marie Costalat-Founeau is full professor of social psychology at the Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier. She has supervised PhD Candidates in the field of identity. She considers identity as a complex and dynamic system connected with actions and normative/subjective capacities in which the latter regulate self-image and have an influence on personal and career projects construction. Her studies have been conducted in various contexts: work (i.e. career transition), culture (i.e. immigration and identity conflicts), and health (i.e. identity alteration). She has participated in various national and international research projects and has been responsible for the Epsylon research unit for six years.


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352

Creating a Service-Minded Careers Culture at Universities by Dreama Johnson

Are you challenged by helping college students expand their thinking of career options in public service?  Do your students have a service mindset, but only see public service as volunteering that occurs outside of the workplace? Or do your students feel there isn’t a strong presence of public service-focused companies hiring at your University? In this session we will discuss the common stereotypes students (and parents) have about careers with social impact and learn about strategies for helping to challenge this culture.  Participants will also hear about the programming, messaging and advising efforts of the University of Virginia Career Center to challenge students to use their knowledge for good in public service careers.


Click here to download the handouts.

Dreama Johnson leads the Public Service and Government Career Community supporting students interested in careers with social impact at the University of Virginia Career Center. Dreama joined the Career Center in July 2012, having previously worked in various offices at the University, including Student Financial Services and the Office of the Dean of Students. She also served as an AmeriCorps member with the Virginia College Advising Corps. Dreama is dedicated to helping students from underserved backgrounds succeed in higher education as she herself was the first in her family to graduate from a four-year college.  Dreama earned her B.A. in Religious Studies and M.Ed. in Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education at the University of Virginia.

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353

An Experiment with the “Whole-Person Development” Approach to Traditional Career Service in a Private Post-Secondary College by Sze Wan Tsang, Joseph Chan Kai Nin, Penny Tse Siu Yin

This session describes the introduction of a comprehensive career services based on a “whole-person development” approach for undergraduate students in a small catholic private post-secondary college in Hong Kong which offers mainly vocationally-oriented programs to around three thousand students. The services, covering employment service, career guidance and career education, involves a wide variety of both traditional and non-traditional career interventions, from individual counselling, workshop, day-camp to training program.

Click here to download the handouts.


Joseph Chan Kai Nin, Advisor, has over forty years of experience in human resources management in the private sector and career counseling at the University of Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong plus career counseling training in both the secondary and tertiary sector in Hong Kong and China. He holds a master’s degree in business administration, counseling and education and fellow membership in the HK Institute of HRM and HK Professional Counselling Association.

Penny Tse Siu Yin, Internship Advisor cum Counselor, has over 10 years working experiences in recreation management at Government and NGOs, individual, group counseling and teaching in Secondary School. Moreover, she has 6 years of experience in career counseling and student development in the private post-secondary sector in Hong Kong. She holds a master’s degree in counseling and she is a certified practitioner of MBTI and PRISM Brain Mapping.



Wendy Tsang Sze Wan, Career Advisor, has 6 years of experience in student affairs and career services in private post-secondary sector in Hong Kong. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Literary and Cultural Studies and she is currently studying for a Master of Science degree in Organizational Behavior. Also, she is a certified practitioner of MBTI.


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354

Finding the Missing Pieces – Experience, Reflection & Co-creation of Service Model for Buddies in Career Transition in Hong Kong & in Asia Pacific Region by Anthony Cheng

In this stimulating & interactive workshop, we will share and explore together the advantages & disadvantages of several service models & options in helping people who have more than 20 years of work experience (The Buddies) for career transition. We will challenge our/your assumptions and intend to co-create enhanced & refined version(s) of service models possibly suitable for Hong Kong and/or other countries/regions in the Asia Pacific region for advocacy and to help solve social problems.



Anthony Cheng, MSSc (Social Work), JCDC, JCTC, has more than 14 years of experience in training & development. He is Director of Coaching & Management Consulting of his own consulting company, Teamwork and Lifework Institute. Voluntarily, Anthony serves as Coaching Sub-group Leader of Buddy Town Hong Kong (a social enterprise set up in 2016, aimed to support people with more than 20 years of working experience for their career transition). Anthony is Member of the National Career Development Association (NCDA), Member of Institute of Management Consultants Hong Kong (IMCHK), etc., and Vice President of Membership of Hong Kong International Coaching Community www.coachinghk.com


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355

Childhood Career Exploration: Planting and Nurturing the Seeds of Career Development by Roberta Neault

Career exploration doesn’t have to wait for secondary/post-secondary school; children can benefit from planting career development seeds early on. Supporting the development of a child’s interests, abilities, sense of self, and future aspirations is just the beginning. Early interventions can also support awareness of diverse work/life activities, healthy relationships, family/community engagement, and effective decision making and problem solving. Join Dr. Roberta Neault as she introduces career exploration strategies for career development practitioners, educators, parents/guardians, and/or community leaders/mentors with an early-year focus. Hear directly from Alicia, her 11-year-old granddaughter, about her own career exploration activities that include a trip to China!

Click here to download the handouts.


Roberta Neault is described above.


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356

Working during Retirement: New Directions in Career Development by NK Chadha, Rashmi Saroha

The demographic changes brought about by increased life expectancy are presenting a challenge to society. There are increasingly less active citizens to pay for the growing population of the retired employees. This calls for the retired and aged to be more actively involved on the professional front. Many workers today continue to work during their so-called “retirement.” The present paper discusses the reasons for working after retirement, opportunities and barriers. Financial risks are discussed with special emphasis on retiring women. The implications for older employees as well as the employers are also discussed.

Click here to download the handouts.


Prof. N. K. Chadha, Past President APCDA and Professor & Chairperson of Research & Doctoral Programmes at MRIU, is a stalwart in the field of Psychology. He has received the Global Practitioner of the Year Award from the National Career Development Association and the Life Time Achievement Award in Psychology from the International Conference on Multidisciplinary Healthcare.  With 40 years of experience in academia and corporate, Dr Chadha has been a Professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Delhi, and holds a PhD from Delhi University and Post Doctorate from the University of Virginia, USA. He has authored 25 books, many of which are used for MA Psychology and Applied Psychology and MBA programs. He has collaborated in many countries and supervised numerous graduate students.

Rashmi Saroha is described above.


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357

Career Selection in Indian College Youth: Role of Mass-Media by Sunil Gupta

This study explores the effects of “mass media” on students’ career selection. The data has been collected through online survey method by employing the Simple Random sampling technique from sixth semester students of three leading colleges of New Delhi. The paper tries to understand the importance of mass-media in career selection of Indian college youth. To achieve this purpose, focused semi structured interviews were conducted with college students of the University of Delhi. By reporting the findings from Indian college youth, the paper provides theoretical and practical implications for career development for college going students in India. This study found that media plays a significant role in career selection.

Click here to download the handouts.

Dr. Sunil Gupta is an Assistant Professor in Zakir Husain Delhi college, Department of Psychology, University of Delhi. His Ph.D. thesis is on, “A psycho-social study on mass-media processes and its impact on well-being.” Dr. Sunil Gupta also holds the position of Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Zakir Husain Delhi College of the University of Delhi.


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361

Towards the Development of Parents’ Coaching Skills for their Children’s Career Choices by Sonia Mendoza

This program was a joint project by Edukasyon.ph and the Career Development Association of the Philippines (CDAP). The main objective of the program is to help parents coach their Grade 9-11 children in wise career decision-making. The trainers were experienced and licensed career counselors of CDAP. The topics covered in the program for parents are: characteristics of their children as millennials, theories on career growth & development, coaching their children, traits that lead them to success. The half-day program was pilot tested with parents in public schools in three different parts of the Philippines. The effectiveness of the program was determined through the parents’ written feedback. Major findings point to the participants appreciation of the program.

Click here to download the handouts.

Sonia Mendoza has a master’s degree in School Counseling from De La Salle University in Manila and is a doctoral candidate in Child & Family Studies at Miriam College in Quezon City.  She has worked as a guidance counselor for several colleges and high schools in the Philippines and as a Recruitment & Training Manager for Consumer Pulse, Inc.  She has served as a consultant, trainer, and speaker throughout her practice.


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362

Indigenous Counseling and Psychotherapy in China: A Scoping Study by Yuan Ying Jin

The purpose of the current study is to examine the important topics, dimensions, variables, designs, and methodologies in the field of indigenous counseling in China. To do so, a scoping approach will be used. The results of the current study will provide various implications for counseling research, practice, and policymaking for providing mental health services to Chinese.


Yuan Ying Jin is a doctoral student majoring in counseling at Korea University, in Seoul, Korea. Previously, she studied in three different countries. She received her undergraduate degree in Public Administration in China, and a master’s degree in School Counseling both in Korea and the United States, and is fluent in three languages (Chinese, Korean, English). She has published several articles in various SSCI journals, demonstrating her skill in conducting comparative research.  Her research interests include the factors that affect career values, including contextual factors, individual factors, etc.


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363

Career and Advising Center (CAC) at Nazarbayev University by Yevgeniya Kim

The Career and Advising Center (CAC) at Nazarbayev University was launched in October 2012 almost at the beginning stage of the University in 2010. CAC provides a comprehensive range of career services to encourage student excellence in career development and prepare for a professional environment. It also works with alumni to promote alumni engagement and affinity and support Nazarbayev University Alumni Association.


Yevgeniya Kim has a BA in English Teaching, MA of International Journalism and Mass Communications majoring in PR, and an Executive Degree in Business Administration. She is Director of the Career and Advising Center at Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan. The Center unites a committed group of professionals who are there to help the students and graduates of Nazarbayev University to successfully connect their academic accomplishments with a wide range of career opportunities.


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381

The Knowdell Career Transition Model: Moving from Counseling to Coaching by Richard Knowdell, Roberta Floyd

The Knowdell Career Transition Model is designed to empower clients to do most of the talking and make 100% of their own career decisions.  This four-stage process (Assessment, Exploration, Focus and Implementation) breaks the career transition process into manageable segments. The presentation will cover the five roles of career coaching (Assessor, Information Provider, Referral Agent, Guide and Tutor) and include five key coaching questions (What, Why, How, When and Who).

Click here to download the handouts.


Richard Knowdell is described above.

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Roberta Floyd is a past president of the National Employment Counseling Association (NECA) and has over 20 years of experience as coordinator of career counseling and employment and training programs. She was a member of the team that developed the Career Development Facilitator program. She is an NCDA CDF Master Trainer.


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382

Women’s Empowerment Club in Vietnam by Felicity Brown, Ngoc Anh Nguyen

The Women’s Empowerment Club (WEC) is an initiative of the US Consulate-General in Ho Chi Minh City, through its cultural arm, The American Center.  RMIT University Vietnam was awarded the grant to run the Club.  From a pool of 200 professional Vietnamese women, three groups of 25 members were selected.  Each Club is a series of workshops and networking events focusing on topics such as leadership, creativity, entrepreneurship, social media, conflict resolution, public speaking and self-awareness, all designed with women in mind. This presentation will cover the WEC proposal, recruitment and selection of participants, implementation, feedback and outcomes.

Click here to download the handouts.

Nguyen Ngoc Anh, Career Consultant, Careers & Industry Relations, RMIT University Vietnam



Felicity Brown has 25+ years’ experience in the banking, government and education sectors.  Originally from Australia, she has been based in Asia for 15 years including Malaysia, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Japan and now in HCMC, Vietnam.  Felicity has worked at RMIT University Vietnam since 2014.  She holds a Master’s of Career Development and is currently the Manager, Career Consulting and Development. A professional member of CDAA, NAGCAS and APCDA, Felicity is passionate about working cross culturally, helping clients develop personally meaningful careers in times of change.


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384

Cracking the “Creative” Case by Lindsay Doung, Reem Buhazza

Breaking into creative sectors like arts, film, theater, museums and advertising demands a unique drive, agility, and skillset. Within Asia, the creative industries historically center around hubs but have been expanding to become more contextualized and regionally relevant. Abu Dhabi is emerging as a regional art hub with the arrival of institutions like the Louvre Abu Dhabi.  At NYU Abu Dhabi, we are helping arts students develop a plan and non-arts students consider the creative. The Career Development Center is preparing students for both the inspiring and challenging realities they will face when pursuing creative industries within Asia. Learn about our strategies to engage faculty, organizations, and other stakeholders to create a culture of experience and improve accessibility to apprenticeships and internships. Discover how we advise students to prepare them to thrive in this dynamic industry. 

Click here to download the handouts.



Reem Buhazza works as Employer Relations Manager at New York University Abu Dhabi Career Development Center. Her work primarily includes employer engagement and relationship management, on-campus recruitment, and on-campus events. Prior to joining NYUAD in 2015, Reem worked as a reporter for various newspaper and magazine publications including The National and Grazia Magazine. Reem holds a bachelor's degree in Creative Writing and English Literature from Kingston University London.


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Lindsay Doung serves as a Career Counselor at the NYU Abu Dhabi Career Development Center, where she advises and supports students specializing in the arts and humanities. Prior to joining the team at NYU Abu Dhabi, Lindsay held the position as Academic Advisor and Career Counselor at UCLA. Lindsay received her BA in Human Development from California State University, Long Beach and her MA in Education with a specialization in Counseling and Guidance from California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo. Additionally, she obtained her Career Development Facilitator certificate with the National Career Development Association.


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385

The Science of Happiness at Work by Dianne Scott

Happiness at work is an essential mindset for connecting career, family life, and society. Being happy at work enables action to maximize performance and achieve potential. It is about having the energy, resilience, and commitment to meet the ever-greater challenges of the global workplace in a positive and sustainable manner.  This program will describe the global research and work conducted by the iOpener Institute located in Oxford, UK, as to what makes people happy at work. More importantly, pragmatic applications will be given detailing how to maximize happiness for individuals, teams, and organizations.


Diane Scott is an executive coach, consultant, and graduate faculty member with decades of experience helping individuals, teams, and organizations achieve their potential. At the iOpener Institute, in Oxford, UK, Diane participated in research leading to ground-breaking innovation in measuring happiness at work and the implications for career development. Serving as graduate faculty at Loyola University for the past decade, Diane specializes in coursework in human resource management and Healthcare finance. She earned Degrees at the University of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University and Georgetown University.


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386

Using Mentorship to Elevate Self-Direction among Students for Job Hunting by Maki Arame, Rei Shimmen Miura

This is a study about assistance methods for college juniors who are in the job hunting process.  It examines how they choose their occupations and make their career decision. There is a crucial need to find assistance methods in order to elevate the self-direction skills of the students during the job hunting. In this study, Dr. Cathy Kram’s mentoring system is used for the senior college student group to help them learn to work as mentors.  Topics include how mentorship is built among students, and how the use of mentorship worked to elevate junior students’ self-direction for job hunting.

Click here to download the handouts.


Rei Shimmen Miura is a JCDA Certified Career Development advisor. She has over 10 years in the career consulting profession and 10 years of working in sales and marketing for an educational publication company and employment agencies.  She currently works as a facilitator and lecturer in guidance, seminars and lessons offered in universities, and counselor’s study workshops.


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Maki Arame is currently in charge of the class of career theory at Polytechnic University Japan.


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387

Understanding the Process of Savoring: A Weekly Diary Study by Hsiao-Feng Cheng

Could positive emotions be enhanced through savoring? How does it happen? The qualitative study was designed to understand how undergraduate students were aware of and amplified positive emotions in their daily life through writing savoring journals once a week. 


Hsiao-Feng Cheng is an assistant professor in the teacher education center at National Taiwan University of Arts (NTUA). She has been studying positive psychology for ten years and has been also teaching the course. She would like to explore the role of positive emotion in positive psychology; therefore she conducted research on how undergraduate students benefited by savoring diaries.


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Friday, May 18

411

Millions of Millennials: The Disconnect in Today’s Workforce, and What We Can Do About It by Hao Guo, Jeremy Hissong, and Season Yao

The future is here. As millennials become increasingly crucial players in our companies, schools, and institutions, generational differences must be explored and embraced. In this session, we will discuss some of the most striking and consequential ways that young workers are reshaping the world around them, and raise ideas about how educators can bridge the gap between young workers’ expectations and the professional needs that they must fulfill.

Click here to download the handouts.

Hao Guo is described above.


Jeremy Hissong is primarily responsible for communication strategy and assessment at the NYU Shanghai Career Development Center. Before joining the Career Development Center, Jeremy worked in Student Involvement overseeing student clubs, conferences, and activities outside the classroom.


Season Yao is the Coordinator of Employer Relations of NYU Shanghai. Season is responsible for managing career programs, marketing and employer relations. She liaises both Chinese and global employers to set up strong relations with the university for internships and year-long engagement. Before joining NYU Shanghai, Season worked as a Reporter & Editor in Shanghai Media Group for 5 years, taking care of new media content production including reporting, editing and maintaining the social media platform and TV program production for International Channel Shanghai. Season graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong with a master's degree in Journalism. She earned her bachelor's degree in International Business from the University of Nottingham.

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412

Using a Career Development Intervention to Support Women in STEM Majors by Yangyang Liu

In the United States and around the world, there is a growing need for qualified individuals in STEM professions. Women, in particular, are vastly underrepresented in STEM fields due to many challenges that they face. This presentation will address both the challenges and approaches to support women students in STEM majors in their career development through the lens of Social-Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT). Based on best practices in literature, an outreach program series specifically for this student population will be proposed. Participants are encouraged to share practices that they have used to support this student population.

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Yangyang Liu is currently a first-year master’s student in Counselor Education with a Career Counseling emphasis at the Pennsylvania State University. She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of California San Diego, in which she served as a Career Peer Educator at the Career Center to assist students with their career readiness through peer advising and outreach programming. She also interned at the Career Center in New York University Shanghai to conduct research related to industries and best career development practices of peer institutions.


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413

Career Transitioning: How Career Counselors Can Facilitate Success for Students Transitioning from Educational Institutions to the Workforce by Julie Rosengren

Transitions generally are difficult as they require a person to change their thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Career transitions for high school students starting studies at tertiary institutions and for university graduates finding a suitable graduate job involves a myriad of changes that are unique to each individual. In this presentation, I will look at a number of factors that contribute to the success of transitioning. These include: the level of experience and quality of support from the Career counselor; suitability of resources provided by the Career counselor; the efficacy of the process used by the Career counselor; the employability of the student transitioning; the level of accountability displayed by the student transitioning; and the motivation of the student transitioning.

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Dr. Julie Rosengren is Founder and Managing Director of the Life Institute of Family Education. She is a Transition Specialist with more than 20 years' experience in researching, writing, training, consulting, coaching and counseling. She has worked across a range of industries including financial services, banking, law, construction, education (including schools), engineering, mining, retail, health, government, recruitment and many more. She has had extensive experience working in Asia and speaks Thai and some Chinese and Japanese. Julie developed various transition education programs including 'practical parenting', 'caring for the aged' and 'career management' based on her doctoral research in changing attitudes and behaviors and increasing a person’s emotional intelligence.


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414

Reach Higher and Linked Learning: The Implications of These Initiatives on Current School Counseling Practices by Loretta Whitson, Marilyn Harryman,  Caroline J. Lopez

Research points to school counselors’ effectiveness in increasing students’ college and career readiness, however they are often underutilized in the public-school system.  This session explores the national Reach-Higher initiative, Linked Learning, an emerging California-based, comprehensive college and career readiness program, and the connection-to and limitations-of school counselors as system-change agents in improving career and college prospects for students at all levels (elementary, middle, high school).  This session will examine these initiatives, analyzing school counseling practices alignment with The American School Counselor Association’s National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs as a tool towards system-wide career development strategies.


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Dr. Loretta Whitson is the Executive Director of the California Association of School Counselors (CASC), the largest state association for school counselors in the U.S.  Previously she served as the Chair of the Educational Counseling program at the University of LaVerne and for over two decades she oversaw Student Support Services, as a school district-level administrator in a leading school district in Southern California.  She has served in numerous state leadership capacities and is often requested to provide expert testimony with the California State Senate and Assembly Education Committees. Her research interests are college and career readiness and school counselor leadership.



Marilyn Harryman, MS Counseling/Psychology, is a career counselor, private practice in San Francisco, CA.  Previously, she served as counselor educator and supervisor for the University of LaVerne and the counselor coordinator for Oakland Public Schools.  She is best known for her work as producer and host of CCC Live - The Counselor Community Connection, Cable TV.  Over the years, Mrs. Harryman has received numerous recognitions including H B McDaniel Foundation Hall of fame recipient; California Association of School Counselors (CASC) Advocate of the Year; and Inroads Foundation, Educator of the Year.


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Dr. Caroline J Lopez is the Executive Director of the California Association of School Counselors (CASC), the largest state association for school counselors in the U.S.  Previously she served as the Chair of the Educational Counseling program at the University of LaVerne and for over two decades she oversaw Student Support Services, as a school district-level administrator in a leading school district in Southern California.  She has served in numerous state leadership capacities and is often requested to provide expert testimony with the California State Senate and Assembly Education Committees. Her research interests are college and career readiness and school counselor leadership.


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416

Assessing the Career Development Needs of Senior High School Students: A Proposal for Career Interventions, Programs, and Assessment by Leonila Urrea

The Senior High School students in the Philippines face unique challenges related to career development. Since the first batch of these students was enrolled in the school year 2016-2017, a significant number of them are still perplexed on the courses they will take in college in spite of their strands/tracks. Guidance counselors must address the needs of this population and decide upon appropriate career intervention topics. This study utilized a career-need assessment survey and focus-group discussion. Results can be used in the development of culturally and contextually relevant career guidance programs and career-related assessment.

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Leonila Urrea is currently the guidance director of the University of the East, supervising the counselors from Basic Education to the College Department.  She has been in school counseling practice for 27 years and has designed and implemented career programs and activities across all levels. She is a strong advocate for the promotion of mental health and psychosocial support services during disaster, which is the topic of her dissertation.  She is currently the corresponding secretary of the Association of Placement Practitioners of Colleges and Universities.


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417

Self-Compassion and Psychological Well-Being among Counselors by Voon Siok Ping, Poh Li Lau

Having a sense of psychological well-being is crucial for counselors’ professional competency. Self-compassion has emerged as a healthy and positive attitude in enhancing counselors’ psychological well-being. However, these essential concepts have not been given much attention in Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between psychological well-being and self-compassion in a sample of counselors in Malaysia (N=200). Counselors’ psychological well-being and self-compassion were measured by the Scales of Psychological Well-Being (SPWB) and Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) respectively. Data was collected by using web-based survey and analyzed by using SEM-AMOS. Results and implication of the study are discussed.


Voon Siok Ping is a PhD Candidate from University of Malaya, Malaysia. She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology (Hons) from HELP University and master’s in Counseling from University of Malaya, Malaysia. She is a registered counselor with the Malaysian Counselor Board.


Poh Li Lau is a senior lecturer in Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at University of Malaya. She received her BA and PhD in Counseling from the University of Malaya, Malaysia. Her research interests include career counseling, positive psychology, resilience and well-being, special needs programs, cross-cultural and psychological testing. She is responsible for in teaching and learning, evaluation activities in undergrad and postgrad counseling program, and consultation projects. She is also a registered counselor in Malaysia.


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421

Beyond Narrative Identity: A Counselling Psychology Graduate Student’s Expansion of Individuality to Universality by Tsz Chui Lai

This presentation illustrates the transformative nature of the experiential-based narrative approach to construct the vocational identity of a counseling psychology graduate student. Through narrating career stories (Cochran, 1997; Savickas, 2011), the student experienced self-generated changes, both intrapersonally and interpersonally. Particularly, the student’s experience of therapeutic change through externalization of her emotions (Tomm, 1989) increased her sense of uniqueness and facilitated her differentiation of self (Bowen, 1978) from the family system. As the student continued to express her narrative and vocational identity, she experienced an unwitting and effortless enhancement of connection with family members. An expansion of her individuality to the universality is recognized, and the student’s narrative identity has helped her flow within them. 

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Tsz Chui Lai is currently working on a MSoSc in Counselling Psychology in Hong Kong Shue Yan University. She has been trained to practice psychotherapy from a person-centered perspective, and often combines this approach with existential and narrative techniques. Miss Lai believes in a person’s self-actualization process. In the therapy, she provides clients autonomy and space to make meaning from their experiences, to construct their sense of individual uniqueness, and to cope with their difficulties with their own strengths. During her practicums, Miss Lai has worked with children and their parents, university students, and community adults. Miss Lai is a graduate member of the Hong Kong Psychological Society.


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422

Self-Concept, Attitudes towards Career Counseling and Work Readiness among Vocational Students in Malaysia by Poh Li Lau

This study examined the relationships among self-concept, attitudes towards career counseling and work readiness among vocational students in Malaysia (N = 574). Self-concept was positively associated with work readiness as hypothesized. Attitudes towards career counseling were examined as potential mediator variables. Using structural equation modeling, attitudes towards career counseling were found to mediate the relation between self-concept and work readiness. These results suggest that, for vocational college students in Malaysia, a more crystallized self-concept may link to greater work readiness skills due, in part, to a positive value of career counseling.


Poh Li Lau is described above.


423

Career Self-Efficacy’s Role in Career Learning Experiences and Outcomes of Graduating College Students by Lena Catalan

The purpose of this study is to determine the role of career self-efficacy on the relationship of one’s career learning experiences and career performance outcomes. These career outcomes are represented by work readiness and career engagement. With the participation of 317 college students, results revealed the importance of developing the graduating students’ self-efficacious beliefs (i.e., mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasion, and physiological state) on their ability to succeed in their chosen course, which helps them become more engaged in their career and bring about their work readiness.

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Lena Catalan has more than 15 years of work experience in the educational sector as Formator, Career Development & Placement Practitioner, Facilitator, Administrator, and Psychologist.  Lena is proud to have made significant contributions in recruitment, psychological assessment, training and development, career assessment and coaching, program/workshop facilitation, implementation and evaluation. Presently, she is teaching CSBGrad classes, where she tackles modules relating to the personal and professional journey of graduating students. Her administrative work however is a full-time position as the Career & Placement Office Head under the Department of Student Life of De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde.


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424

Career Services Provider Credentialing in Japan and Expected Competencies for those with Career Consultant License by Midori Nonogaki, Shujiro Mizuno

Discussion on the status of career services provider credentialing in Japan and how those certified career consultants view their competencies. The presenters will discuss how the 21st career consultants or counselors prepare to do the professional level jobs as expected.

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Shujiro Mizuno, EdD, is a certified clinical psychologist, professor in the Psychology Department at Rissho University, and former President of Certified Counselors in Japan. His major fields are ethics, moral education, and counseling psychology. He co-authored Happiness and Virtue beyond East and West, Charles Tuttle, 2012. He is the executive director of Japan Industrial Counseling Association and President of Japan Peer Mediation Association.


Midori Nonogaki, BA, is a Specially Appointed Professor at Asia University, CEO of Emergence, Inc. Committee Chair of Career Consultant Research Promotion of Japan Industrial Counseling Association, and Japan Country Director for APCDA. Her major work is in career education for university students, providing supports for career development, organizational development, mental health to individuals in the business field as a practitioner based in the narrative approach, training instructor, and group facilitator.


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426

Narrative Career Counseling: Constructing a Career Future in Context by Hazel Reid

This research summary reports on an in-depth study of narrative career counseling with five diverse participants. It will outline the biographical research approach and the model used in the career counseling conversations, before highlighting the findings. Examples from the research will be used to illustrate the effectiveness of the method, but a critique will also be included. The research took place in the UK, but the presentation will also consider the appropriateness of applying a narrative approach in other contexts.

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Hazel Reid is a Professor of Education and Career Development and the Director of Research in the Faculty of Education at CCCU. She researches in the area of career and guidance theory and practice and clinical supervision. She also supervises and examines students undertaking Doctoral research. Hazel is a Fellow of the Career Development Institute, the Higher Education Academy and a NICEC Fellow (National Institute of Careers Education & Counselling). She serves on the editorial board of the (international) British Journal of Guidance & Counselling.  She is involved in European projects related to the work of career guidance counselors and publishes widely.


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431

Hope-Centered, Actively Engaged Career Development by Norman Amundson 

The Hope-Action navigation approach provides a holistic view of career development and focuses on the importance of hope as a center point. Rotating around Hope are action dimensions such as self-reflection, self-clarity, visioning, goal setting, planning, implementing, adapting and environmental influences. In this presentation he will be exploring this Hope-Action navigation approach with particular emphasis on practical intervention strategies for building and maintaining hope. These interventions are rooted in “active engagement” and incorporate metaphors, collaboration, physical action, and perspective shifting.

Dr. Norman Amundson is a Professor in Counselling Psychology at the University of British Columbia, Canada.  He has given numerous workshops and has been a keynote speaker at many national and international conferences. In his writings, he emphasizes the importance of creativity, imagination, cultural awareness, positive affirmation, hope, and active engagement. He has an active research program and his publications include over 100 journal articles; training DVDs; and books and workbooks – many of which have been translated into different languages. He has received a number of awards from professional associations, including the 2014 NCDA Eminent Career Award and an honorary doctorate from the University of Umea, in Sweden.


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