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New Zealand Country Information

New Zealand Country Director:
Kathryn Scott
Senior Organizational Development Council
Auckland Council
NewZealand@AsiaPacificCDA.org

New Zealand Country Report by Jean Ottley

Increasing workforce engagement

In New Zealand, local and national Government are very aware of the need to address persistent or projected skills shortages. Employers report a disconnect between education outcomes and their workforce needs.

Several reviews are underway, including a Productivity Commission review of the tertiary sector and a formal review of the Ministry of Education.

There is an advocacy role for leaders in career development, working through the key influences of employers and educators to increase engagement.

Careers New Zealand strategic priorities

In their Statement of Intent for the years 2014-2018 Careers New Zealand lists strategic priorities as

  1. Developing a Career Knowledge Hub
  2. Digitisation of delivery
  3. Strengthening work with industry, government agencies, the education sector, and community organisations.

The strategic priorities are informed by the New Zealand Government's Better Public Services goals, and in particular:

  • Improving citizens' interactions with government
  • Boosting skills and employment
  • Reducing long-term welfare dependence

The National Lifelong Career Development Forum

Currently in New Zealand there is no overarching policy or strategy for career development. In response, the National Lifelong Career Development Forum, comprised of cross-sector career professionals, aims to build the understanding that, although agencies are using different lenses and concepts, we are talking about parts of the same whole e.g. career development and career planning, workforce preparation and workforce development.

CDANZ Professionalism Project

The Professionalism Project is an initiative from the Career Development Association of New Zealand to work on professional standards to profile and guide the association and industry. In 2016 the team aims to complete a refresh of the CDANZ Code of Ethics.

CDANZ Digital Strategy

The project intends to craft a well-considered strategy which has both a pragmatic and philosophical foundation; pragmatic because along with those who use our services, we are increasingly moving to digital platforms, and philosophical because we have a professional responsibility to be well-informed about ethical use of technologies.


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New Zealand Research Symposium 2015 by Jean Ottley


On Monday 23 November the Career Development Association of New Zealand (CDANZ) will hold its annual National Research and Leading Practice Symposium. This is the premier event on the CDANZ calendar and in 2015 will run in partnership with Massey University and Careers New Zealand.

The theme of the Symposium is THRIVING. We thrive when we are prosperous and growing. We seek to thrive as individuals, we seek it in our practice, and for our industry. We seek it for our clients and for all New Zealand. The 2015 Symposium will explore what it takes to thrive.

On Tuesday 24 November following the Symposium, CDANZ will hold their AGM & Professional Development Day. This is a day for members and parties who have a sincere interest in the work of CDANZ. The day includes a formal AGM along with topical speakers and a facilitated workshop on Invigorating Branches. CDANZ Members will have valuable opportunities to discuss, reflect, and envision the future for the Association and the careers industry.



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New Zealand Country Report - February 2015 by Julie Urbahn


Two major career development events were held in November, the Careers and Transitions Education Association (CATE) conference and the Career Development Association of New Zealand National Symposium.

The CATE conference was held in the stunning city of Tauranga, Western Bay of Plenty. The thematic strands of the conference were Connect, Collaborate and Contribute, with keynote speakers such as Dr Peter McIlveen, Ass Professor of the University of Southern Queensland, Australia (Towards conversational padagogy of learning and work in people's lives), Dr Carol Johnson, Ass Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Stout (Finding meaning in career path narratives) and Josh Williams, Senior Policy Manager in the Tertiary Education group. The notes are not yet on the CATE website, but should appear soon here.

This year's CDANZ National Symposium was a great success. Papers included: "Chance, Happenstance, Serendipity: a 'how to' workshop," by Robyn Baily and Michael Richardson; "Who were they: What did they come for? And what more did they want? Online and phone guidance with young people," by Pat Cody (Careers New Zealand); "Paper for Career Engagement of New Zealand Career Development Practitioners," by Dale Furbish and "If I only knew then what I know now – A retrospective view of retired cricket players on career transitions and plans" by Lynette Reid. If you would like to read more from the CDANZ National Symposium you will find the papers on the CDANZ website here.

In May 2014, Keith Marshall was appointed as Chief Executive of Careers New Zealand. Keith is a past deputy chief executive of NZQA and the former chief executive of Nelson City Council. He has owned Thrifty Rental Cars NZ, managed the last nationwide health reforms, and participated in the NZ-China Free Trade Agreement negotiations.

In July 2014, Careers New Zealand launched the updated Career Education Benchmarks-Secondary. The Secondary Benchmarks are part of the suite including Career Education Benchmarks Year 7 and * and the Career Development Benchmarks-Tertiary. The revised benchmarks include a new Transitions dimension indicating the importance of transitions in, through, and out of secondary school. You will find more information on the benchmarks on the Careers New Zealand website here.


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New Zealand Country Report- April 2014 by Julie Urbahn


New Zealand is of a similar geographical size to Japan, with its closer neighbor being Australia 2,230 kilometers away. It is highly dependent on the primary sector, with exports of goods and services accounting for around one-third of its gross domestic product (GDP). It has a small population of 4½ million, with young people aged 12-24 years old representing 20% of the total population. Ethnic diversity is increasing, with Maori, the indigenous people, making up nearly 700,000. The five largest ethnic groups are New Zealand European, Maori, Chinese, Samoan and Indian.

The New Zealand Government has set 10 challenging goals for the public sector to achieve over the next five years. These goals sit under 5 broad headings: Reducing long-term welfare dependence, Supporting vulnerable children, Boosting skills and employment, Reducing crime and Improving interaction with government. For more information, see Better Public Services: Results for New Zealanders.

It is also important to mention that New Zealand is legislated to provide culturally appropriate career services to Maori. This legislation is based on the founding document Treaty of Waitangi, which was signed in 1840 between the British Crown and Maori. The treaty is based on three key principles; protection, participation and partnership. In 2008 the Ministry of Education outlined its Maori Education Strategy, Ka Hikitia. Throughout the strategy the focus is on "supporting local solutions for local change, by local communities" and providing activities to raise awareness, provide support and seek contributions from students, parents, whanau (family and wider families), hapu (sub-tribe), iwi (tribe), Maori organizations, communities and business.

Career service in New Zealand is provided in a range of ways; public, private and through community organizations. Careers New Zealand is the government funded provider and is seen as the government's center of careers expertise. Generally the services are not age segmented. However, there is an important focus on developing the career education and career management skills of young people early during their schooling and transition to work. This focus results in the delivery of programs that are targeted to young people, particularly Maori and Pasifika youth. The Government sees Careers NZ's role as helping to lift educational achievement and employment outcomes for these specific ethno-cultural groups who are seen to have been disadvantaged by previous systems.

Careers NZ's services and products include:

  • website and online tools (www.careers.govt.nz)
  • programs to build career management capability in the community
  • career education supporting services, using the suite of benchmarks for career education
  • regional events and a wide range of local initiatives
  • technology-enabled advice and guidance services such as Chat Online About Your Career Options

Careers NZ also connects educators and industries through a program of Career Capable Communities and Career Networks to improve the matching of labor skills supply and demand. To find out more about the services that Careers New Zealand provide, read Careers New Zealand's Statement of Intent.

Schools

Career education and guidance in New Zealand schools is offered in years 7 to 13. Each school's board has responsibility to:

  • ensure that the career education and guidance needs of all students and the aspirations of their communities are reflected in the school's strategic planning and reporting
  • ensure that the school's community, in particular Maori and Pasifika, have opportunities to contribute to career education and guidance strategies
  • ensure there is an appropriate level of funding and resources to meet the career education needs of the students
  • encourage a whole-school approach to career education.

These requirements are outlined in the National Administration Guidelines.

Secondary schools receive a Career Information Grant, which is based on the decile rating and number of students in that school. Decile ratings are based on a combination of socio-economic factors. The lower the decile, the more funding a school receives. The Career Information Grant is not "tagged," which means that the money may be used for purposes other than career education. Most schools have a Careers Advisor and depending on its size this advisor may be supported by a team. There are a number of career related programs such as Gateway, Vocational Pathways, Star and Academies. For more information go to Career Education and Guidance in New Zealand Schools. The professional body for school staff, working in careers is Careers and Transition Education (Aotearoa) NZ (CATE). Careers New Zealand has developed a set of benchmarks to support schools when reviewing their careers programs. These can be downloaded from the Careers New Zealand website Career Education Benchmarks – Secondary and Career Education Benchmarks – Year 7 & 8. These benchmarks have been endorsed by the Ministry of Education.

Private Sector

Private practitioners and community organizations provide a range of career services to individuals and groups. The professional body that represents career practitioners in New Zealand is the Career Development Association of New Zealand (CDANZ). Members are required to meet a range of professional practice competencies. CDANZ provides regular professional development throughout the country, a range of resources and also publishes a quarterly Ezine.

Tertiary

New Zealand's tertiary system includes universities, institutes of technology, polytechnics, Wananga (publicly owned institutes that provide education in a Maori cultural context), industry training organizations (ITOs), private training establishments (PTEs) and community organizations. These institutions offer a range of career services, which vary depending on the institution and/or type of funding mechanism. To support tertiary providers, Careers New Zealand has developed the Career Development Benchmarks – Tertiary, which you are able to download. The Ministry of Education has recently launched its new Tertiary Education Strategy.

Employers

Many employers offer career related support to their staff. Large organizations may offer learning and development opportunities. Some provide career support by hiring consultants, providing career development as an HR function, providing literacy and numeracy support and making ongoing tertiary programs available. Careers New Zealand is developing careers information and resources and already has the For Employers section on their web site. Industry Training Organizations (ITOs) also provide opportunities for training on the job. For more information go to http://www.careers.govt.nz/education-and-training/workplace-training-and-apprenticeships/workplace-and-industry-training-contacts/.

Careers Qualification

In New Zealand, there are a number of institutions that offer a career guidance qualification:

  • Auckland University of Technology (AUT)
    • Graduate Certificate in Career Development (Level 7)
    • Graduate Diploma in Career Development (Level 7)
  • Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT)
    • Diploma in Career Guidance (Level 6)
  • Otago Polytechnic

If you would like more information please feel free to contact Julie Urbahn at Julie.urbahn@careers.govt.nz. Grad Dip Career Development, CDANZ, Business Development Advisor, Careers New Zealand


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Benchmarking Career Education in New Zealand - September 2013 by Julie Urbahn

Careers New Zealand launched the Career Education Benchmarks – Secondary in 2011, the Career Development Benchmarks – Tertiary in December 2012, and the Career Education Benchmarks – Year 7 and 8 in March 2013.

"The completion of the suite of benchmarks is a major milestone for the education sector. High quality career education is a vital ingredient in securing a more prosperous future for our young people and for New Zealand," said Dr. Graeme Benny, Careers New Zealand Chief Executive.

The suite of three benchmarks are self-review tools that New Zealand schools and tertiary organisations can use to critique the career education they deliver to their students against approved best practice criteria. They provide practical steps on how to make and measure improvements. They are already in wide use in a number of secondary schools and tertiary providers around New Zealand.

At the heart of the benchmarks are the student career management competencies that each student needs to develop to enable them to successfully transition from year 8 to secondary school, and from compulsory education to tertiary study or work.

Career Education Benchmarks – Year 7 and 8

In April Associate Minister of Education and Minister of Youth Affairs, Nikki Kaye launched the Career Education Benchmarks – Year 7 and 8 at Pukekohe Intermediate School in Auckland.

The year 7 and 8 benchmarks focus on improving the transition from intermediate to secondary school rather than on students making career decisions. "At year 7 young people are just beginning to form a concept of what "career" is – something that many adults still struggle with. At Careers New Zealand we define a career as being 'the sequence and variety of work roles – paid and unpaid – that someone is involved in over a lifetime.' Everyone has a career," said Dr Benny.

Improvements in career education at year 7 and 8 will mean that more students reach secondary school with a better understanding of themselves and how to choose the right subjects to enable them to be on the correct path to a career that is right for them.

Career Education Benchmarks – Secondary

The New Zealand Government has a Youth Guarantee programme with a goal that all students will achieve level 2 in the National Certificate in Educational Achievement – which it sees as the minimum qualification for success. High quality and effective career education in secondary schools is a key contributor to achieving this goal as it enables students to make the connection between education and employment.

"Career education in secondary schools is the engine room of our systems for helping young people develop what are called career management competencies," says Paul Dalziel, Professor of Economics at Lincoln University.

Feedback from one secondary school that is using the benchmarks said "the benchmarks have shined a light on what is required and provide a clear direction of where to head with our career education. They are like a puzzle and I can see that we have some pieces, but there are many missing."

A recent survey of 332 schools conducted by Careers New Zealand found that 89% were either currently using or planning to use the benchmarks in 2013. This strong up-take of the benchmarks indicates that a high number of New Zealand schools are on their way to embedding best practice career education.

There is no compulsion for schools or tertiary organisations to use the benchmarks. However, the New Zealand Ministry of Education’s National Administration Guidelines state that schools must provide appropriate career education and guidance for all students year 7 and above. Consequently many secondary schools have specialist careers advisors. One of the key dimensions in the self-review process for schools is that career development programmes and services are embedded in all key school documents and practices and not just the preserve of careers advisors.

Career Development Benchmarks – Tertiary

Dr. Peter Coolbear, President of Ako Aotearoa – National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, said at the launch of the tertiary benchmarks that there is an "assumption that tertiary learners are purposeful and have made careful evaluations on how study will support their career aspirations, however, the opposite is often true. Many are 'nervous explorers' – lacking in confidence in either their abilities or choices, or both. They are 'accidental travellers' exploring tertiary opportunities on minimal information."

The Career Development Benchmarks – Tertiary are an attempt to address this. They are a self-review tool for tertiary organisations to assess the quality of their career development programmes and services, and they articulate what good practice looks like from level 2 to postgraduate level.

One of the key competencies in the tertiary benchmarks is that students develop a marketable identity. Students who can articulate their values, skills, and interests, and who have a sense of self-awareness and can articulate these to prospective employers have will have developed a coherent and robust marketable identity. Tertiary organisations with a high number of students with this competency can assess themselves as being highly competent in their career education practises according to the benchmarks.

Improved career development services in tertiary organisations will mean more students with the competencies to enable them to make sound career decisions and study choices, realise their potential, complete their qualifications and become effective contributors to New Zealand’s economy and society. "The tertiary benchmarks are highly aspirational, but so they should be: they are a critically important enabler for people to pursue happy and fulfilled lives," said Dr. Coolbear.

If you would like to read the benchmarks, or find out about frequently asked questions, go to the links provided at the beginning of this article. Also, you are welcome to contact Julie Urbahn at Julie.urbahn@careers.govt.nz.

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